Analysis Of Violence By Nhat Hanh

According to Nhat Hanh, when we watch a bad TV program, “we become the TV program…” (Hanh, 13). Hanh implies that watching violent entertainment can alter our mindsets and cause us to becoming more accepting of violence. He states that these bad TV programs are created to “make our hearts pound, our fist tighten, and leave us exhausted” (pg.14). Hanh believes that movie producers are not concerned about the detrimental effects that violence has on viewers, but instead solely care about the money they will make for having a thrilling, action-packed movie. Nevertheless, Hanh urges us to be aware of the toxic nature of this entertainment. To begin with, Hanh strongly believes that violent entertainment guides us in a wrong direction and shapes …show more content…
To begin with, she believes that “viewing violence increases the fear of becoming a victim of violence, which results in an increase in self-protective behaviors and increase mistrust of others” (Bok, 57). As a result, people may have paranoia and anxiety because they believe that the world is more dangerous than it actually is (“mean world syndrome”). Bok believes that as we reminisce about violent media, the violence will become natural, and we will become desensitized to it. According to Bok, “Viewing violence increases desensitization, resulting in calloused attitudes toward violence directed at others and a decreased likelihood to take action in behalf of the victim when violence occurs” (Bok, 58). Unfortunately, people become less shocked when violence occurs in the real world because they are so accustomed to seeing it on the media. For example, a research study showed that men were “increasingly comfortable” with violence against women in films and considered it “less violent than they thought it would be” (Bok, 72). Like Hanh, Bok believes that media violence causes us to be in denial of how prevalent violence actually is in our society because our entertainment makes it seem so “normal”. Furthermore, media …show more content…
In the opening scene, Bond follows a man into the bathroom and begins an explicit fighting scene in a black-and-white suspenseful format. He slams the man’s head into a bathroom stall’s door, pushes the man so hard into a sink that it shatters, and brutally chokes the man as he drowns his head in a sink full of running water. A few moments later, he shoots an agent in cold blood. When the man is dead, he acts as if nothing has happened. Although this scene is traumatic, the filmmakers characterize Bond as being heroic because he is always able to conquer his enemies. Throughout this movie, violence is portrayed as being cool and exhilarating. Bond murders hundreds of people in the movie and never seems to feel remorse. This pollutes viewers’ minds by sparking an appetite for violence and desensitizing them from it because murder seems so normal in the

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