Essay On Ethics Of Care

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Care, defined from Webster dictionary, are the things that are done to keep someone healthy, or safe. The ethics of care understands that caring for a person depends on interpersonal connections and the morally concerned person so it does change from person to person. The ethics of care does not reflect traits from deontology and has persuasive qualities but also an irreparable defect. The ethics of care allows people to show empathy for whom they choose to and gives leeway for humanity to be partial. The central focus of this view is the “compelling moral salience of attending to and meeting the needs of the particular others for whom we take responsibility.” There are no rules to this because people are allowed to show emotion for whom …show more content…
This ensures that people do not have the freedom to do whatever they please and aspects in life would retain meaning and not lose affection behind actions and/or words. There is not a set of rules that everyone in society has to follow saying something is inherently wrong because this views allow people to be actual human beings who have feeling and who make mistakes. There are no punishments because the ethics of care looks at people who show egotistical feelings as morally concerned people. To avoid bias, “the ethics of care rejects the view of the dominant moral theories that the more abstract the reasoning about a moral problem the better.” They reject the theories because the ethics of care recognizes and praises the interpersonal relationships people have with each other. The ethics of care also embodies that the “household is a private sphere beyond politics into which government, based on consent, should not intervene,” and in public life the ethics of care recognizes and “addresses moral issues arising in relations among the unequal and dependent.” In

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