The Emergence Of The New African Movement In The 19th Century

Improved Essays
The emergence of the New African Movement in the 19th century can be marked as a turning in the way Africans resisted colonialism. In this essay i will identify the ideas and developments of the New African Movement during the end of the 19th century and the first few decades of the twentieth century.
Around the 19th century it became more evident that Europeans where not only planning on staying in South Africa but they would further exclude and exploit African bodies. Many Africans had resisted European colonialism since their arrival but in the 19th century the nature of this resistance took a new turn. This was due to the formation of the New African Movement which consisted of writers, political and religious leaders, artists, teachers
…show more content…
This essay was called the ‘Negro question’ where he argued that African Americans should be appropriated as an intellectual and tasks and historical process. Plaaitjie created a metaphysics of principles and values in hopes in would unite blacks within a similar identity. He was also part of the development of the ANC and was secretary.
The inspiration of Ethiopianism and Semes intellectualism led to plaaitje having his own development which was a book he published in London about the 1913 Natives land act. The book was named Native life in S.A and used Seme’s spirit of resistance and political organisation where even travelled worldwide raising awareness about SA conditions for Africans.
Plaatje and Seme works and ideologies had inspired a very historic event that had happened within the 19th century. The father of Pan-Africanism Sylvester Williams from Trinidad who had been in London was inspired by these New African Movement intellectuals. A year later this led to a development which could be considered part of the New African Movement he launched Pan-Africanism. This was not widespread at a time but a Ghanaian New African movement intellectual who resided in S.A developed his own paper of S.A Spectator. Where worked on connecting The New African Movement, Pan-Africanism and African

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    Some of the information dates back to the eighteen hundred on the past explorations of Dr. David Livingston, Mungo Park, and Henry Morton Stanley. The use of nineteen and twentieth-century primary sources provided evidence that helped to identify and verify African pre-colonial history. By using the data collected, this paper will give the reader an understanding on how African pre-colonial history was rejected by nineteen-century Europeans scholars. The reader will be able to understand why the suppressing fragmented African history, together with the progress and the reason for the implementation. In the end, the reader will have a new understanding of the importance of Black History Month and the existing calls for printed versions of the various peasant communities, nations, and regions of the African…

    • 1416 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Decolonization of Africa by David Birmingham is a detailed account of the struggle between African and European countries to decolonize. As many African countries began to come together, they decided that they were more fit to govern their own people than any outside controllers. However, in this essay I will argue that it was Ghana that created an African revolution and led to more countries becoming decolonized; but it was a long and difficult road for all countries and many things were sacrificed to achieve the ultimate goal of independence. The Decolonization of Africa created a timeline of the decolonization of many African colonies. While some countries began the move to being independent prior to World War II, many countries did…

    • 1544 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Introduction Pan-Africanism is an important concept within the theory of nationalism that was conceived of at the end of the 19th century and remains to be a vital component in a variety of ways pertaining to Africa. Pan-Africanism was a tool in the struggle against colonialism utilized by at first, members of the African Diaspora and later by people and groups within Africa in their struggle for independence. The ability of the African people to unify was seen as integral in their efforts to resist European domination and the ability to attain self-rule. There are a variety of views and definitions on Pan-Africanism but a majority of scholars agree that some degree of unification whether politically, socially, culturally, or economically…

    • 6440 Words
    • 26 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Colonialism helped to destruct and de-civilize the continent of Africa while also serving as the basis for African-Americans to establish themselves in “uniquely and innovative ways” (Gomez 184). Although Colonialism was used to “civilize” the continent of Africa, it was the harsh effects that transformed the African Americans into using the ideologies of art in the Harlem Renaissance. Because “black people have always maintained a dynamic and vibrant life of the mind”, Colonialism help serve as a challenge to overcome for greater success and implant significant expressions through powerful movements like the Harlem Renaissance (Gomez 184). Colonization is the idea of "thingification" or the process of turning the colonizer into a thing by denying him his humanity as "the colonizer sees the other man as an animal, treats him like an animal and transforms himself into…

    • 1171 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    African Mission Trip

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages

    This “charismatic religiosity provided a survival technique for Africans in the midst of the disquiet of those years and stamped African Christianity with an identity that contested missionary control and its monopoly of Christian expression.” Missionary forces were exhausted, and instead a new self- identity started forming in the hearts of Africans around the continent (Kalu 782-787). This new sense of pride caused many nations to start fighting for independence. These changes helped connect newly independent African nations to the world. As a result, But as Africa once again sank into despair, missionaries once again started to rise. The new nationalism in Africans made missionary preaching such as African inferiority unsuccessful and thus weakened missionary power(Kalu 782-787).…

    • 1103 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    For instance, I recall when the man was giving a speech and he said “United States of Africa”. This seemed like something they were trying achieve; however, as the saying goes “all that glitter is not gold”. Fortunately, for Africa that they had African Nationalist to help them understand like Kwame Nkrumah, an African nationalists that formed the Convention People’s Party. In The Wind of Change (the end of colonialism in Africa), the narrator mentions how Nkrumah “dreamed of a day when all of Africa would be united under a single flag and have a stars for each country that would be black”. Nkrumah went to great lengths to make sure that decolonization was going in the right direction and not just becoming comprised for Europeans.…

    • 1162 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Preaching the unity of all blacks, he claimed that liberty would come only through the return of African- Americans to their ancestral continent. In the 1920s through to the 1930s, the ANC appropriated Garvey’s notions of racial pride and pan- Africanism to aid in South Africa’s struggles against colonialism and racial subjugation. Further to this, inspired by Woodrow Wilson’s call for self- determination leaders of the ANC condemned the colonial system for embracing contradictory policies to those inferred by Wilson’s Fourteen Point’s and this propelled them to take matters into their own hands. Following the signing of the 1919 Treaty of Versailles, black South Africans were deceptively led to hope for changed in the countries’ political system and that did its part to further infuriate black South Africans creating a favorable environment for the ANC to indorse resistance against imperialism by white minority rule. Decades later, the implementation of the 1941 Atlantic Charter described a biosphere of free people with rights, and the ANC interpreted the Charter as a promise for finally obtaining liberty from tyranny and oppression.…

    • 1717 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Great Essays

    Nigerian author Chinua Achebe is often considered to be the “father of modern African literature” (Alam, 102). He grew up in a time when Africans first began to challenge the power of the European colonists and their intrusion into African life (Sadeghi, 49), which is reflected in his first novel Things Fall Apart. A recurring theme in Achebe’s works is the representation of native African cultures and values before, during and after the colonial era. According to Achebe, “African peoples did not hear of culture for the first time from Europeans. […] They had poetry and, above all, they had dignity” (Ojaide, 150).…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This story of Things Fall Apart was written in 1958. Achebe writes postcolonial stories as his intentions are “to correct the distorted representation of Africa that European writers had delivered to European audiences and to show the impact that colonization had on cultures” (Davis et al.1599). By using the character Okonkwo, Chinua Achebe demonstrates the struggles he encounters in the story to maintain his character together after the changes in law and religion the colonizers brought to his village.During the beginning of the text Okonkwo is described to be a high ranking member of the nigerian…

    • 1897 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    President Lincoln wasn’t in favor of this bill in the beginning due to the impact may affect the African American war against slavery. He had different agenda that may be a solution to slavery. One of the idea president Lincoln adapted even before becoming the president of the United States of America is colonization. Colonization is an idea where slaved should be freed and encouraged or required by the government to move to other places. Africa, South America, or the Caribbean was some of the places the former slave can go to and start there colonize.…

    • 843 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays