Impact Of The Harlem Renaissance

1295 Words 5 Pages
“Black folk have always maintained a dynamic and vibrant life of the mind. Not even slavery, Reconstruction’s failure, and the rise of state-sponsored terrorism could stamp out their creativity and scientific genius” (Gomez 2005, 183). While many things have been taken from black people, they can’t and won’t be stripped of their happiness and creativity. Throughout the Diaspora blacks have been faced with enduring the struggles of colonialism, which became the symbol for white supremacy and cultural oppression. European countries scrambled to divide Africa while exploiting the continent’s resources and their people. What the Europeans did not consider was the fact that they were splitting up tribes, causing wars which eventually led to a class …show more content…
This “New Negro Movement” brought black life to reality through its literary, artistic, and intellectual aesthetic. The cultural celebration of the Harlem Renaissance signified “The idea . . . that a different kind of black person was emerging out of the shadows of the past, a person much more assertive and demanding of his rights” (Gomez 2005, 185). Blacks reinvented “the Negro” from what they had previously been in the past as a result of white stereotypes that influenced black culture. Blacks were breaking free of racist beliefs while adopting a great sense of racial pride. The movement was a cultural expression of blackness. According to Michael Gomez, “. . . black aesthetic had the effects of intensifying cultural production . . .” (Gomez 2005, 184). Simply put, Gomez argues that black art strengthened black culture. The discovery of this renaissance was the discovery or rebirth of a new black culture. Thus, The Harlem Renaissance was a symbol for the revival of blacks after a past filled with turmoil. It changed the image in which blacks everywhere were seen, while riding them of their past challenges at the hands of …show more content…
This ideology and movement challenges the struggles against slavery, colonialism, and racism. In addition to these struggles, Pan-Africanism worked against the inferiority complex of many black people. In “Introduction” to Philosophy and Opinion of Marcus Garvey Hollis R. Lynch states, “Black slavery, ingrained racial prejudice against blacks, the reputed backwardness of Africa, and, after its partition by European powers, the necessity to ride Africa of colonial rule and exploitation, all provided stimulus for the pan-African idea and action” (Lynch 2016, 79). That is to say Pan-Africanism was necessary to combat colonialism and racial prejudice against blacks. Furthermore, the ideals of Pan-Africanism emerged in response to the negativity derived throughout Africa in the past. The common struggle of oppression thought to be faced by African’s everywhere should result in a common solution, a united African front. As a result, blacks settling in Africa, “. . . shall enter into a common partnership to build up Africa in the interests of our race” (Jaques-Garvey 2016, 98). This means blacks everywhere should join together in producing a better Africa, while using their similar goals as a means of doing so. And according to Pan-Africanist ideologies those interests/goals will be very much the same. The idea of white supremacy will then

Related Documents