Five Theories Of The African American Family

Good Essays
To gain a better understanding of the African American family, one must study the African philosophy and cosmology. By learning about the philosophies origins and its five themes, the black family will be able to harmonize itself and begin to see what is wrong with research done by people like E. Franklin Frazier and Daniel Moynihan. Once this is accomplished the black family can free itself from western conceptual incarceration.
There are five central themes in African philosophy and cosmology that are outlined by T’Shaka. These themes are harmonious twin-ness, unicity, Maat, Nommo or the word, and transformation and change from the lower self to higher through spiral motion (T’Shaka 90). The first theme is harmonious twin-ness. According
…show more content…
Franklin Frazier and Daniel Moynihan. Their theories oppose the theories of the African philosophy and cosmology. E. Franklin Frazier saw the family as a matriarchal unit (The State of the African American Family). However, in the African philosophy and cosmology, “men and women are in internal harmony with a cosmos...based on harmony, balance, [and] unity” (T’Shaka 90). In addition, Frazier believed that the African American family was disorganized from the beginning because casual sexual relations and not marriages were dominant during slavery (The State of the African American Family). The African philosophy and cosmology states, on the other hand, that sacred secular unions once existed, and seeks to bring them back in black societies (T’Shaka 90). This idea does demonstrate that the African family was once a stable and organized unit, despite what Frazier believes. However, the African American family is now a muddled institution and Daniel Moynihan believed that the government must step in and provide assistance to African American families to keep them from falling apart. Yet, the African philosophy and cosmology instead believes that themes such as unicity, harmonious twin-ness, and Maat need to be taught to black families in order to restore families (T’Shaka 91). The ideas of the African philosophy and cosmology are not the only lessons that African Americans need to be …show more content…
What this phenomenon is, is best explained by Oba T’Shaka when he describes black people comparing themselves to beauty standards made for white people (p.163). Two different groups of people with distinct looks cannot be held to the same beauty standards. This is the same when comparing the black family to white families. However, in order for researchers and African American people to free themselves from western conceptual incarceration, they must be taught an alternative view. Black people, and those who research black people, need to be taught the African philosophy and cosmology and its themes. In addition, people need to understand the origins of the African philosophy. Books and movies that highlight the African family before slavery and colonization will show people what inspired African philosophy, and media showing black families and people living by African philosophy themes in the present day will also be educational. Through these, the people can learn about the black family from a perspective that is based on them, not other races and

Related Documents

  • Decent Essays

    African Americans did not want assimilation into the white culture, but rather, recognition of their black culture with equal rights and freedom, an integrated society (Hansberry, 1959). The characters’ class, gender and race create struggles for all, in the play A Raisin in the Sun, it is through this struggles, dreams become closer to reality and the family connects (Hansberry,…

    • 1296 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    . This is the cause of the lack of development for Africana knowledge. Pentony believes we can develop as a society, stating “To accomplish this, black people, like all people, need to know they are not alone. They need to know that their ancestors were not just slaves laboring under the white man’s sun, but that their lineage can be to important kingdoms and significant civilizations. They need to be familiar with the black man’s contribution to the arts and sciences.…

    • 934 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Education was encouraged within John’s family. In society during the post-Civil War blacks obtaining an education was seen as unnecessary. This created the double consciousness that black John struggles with throughout the essay. Once John comes back from college he finally realizes his role within both cultures. John realized that blacks could overpower the whites and overcome the social stigma if they became united as a whole.…

    • 1207 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    For hundreds of years, beginning from the time of colonization, African Americans were taught to self-hate themselves. The image of Africa has been portrayed negatively in a way in which the people of that country are said to not be civilized. Moreover, this quote implies people of color should not let others dictate who and what should be considered a standard model of character. African Americans must first embrace their own appearance and who they are as an individual; including acknowledging themselves before anticipating that others do the same. Furthermore, people of color who reject Africa are also rejecting themselves without realizing it due to the fact that generations of ancestors commenced in Africa.…

    • 1115 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The Black Studies Movement

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages

    To fight against the oppressor, we will view then to be less. To help African-Americans understand that there are not victims but have the capacity to change their lives and history. Meyer and Azibo take their teachings and help students not only think critically but to also analyze the racial dominance. Without fear, they are able to succeed and embrace the education of the black community. The African Studies was pivotal in empowering the black community; to embrace the change and change the way society has portrayed their…

    • 1445 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    The perceptions on the effects of African American culture appropriations on the minority black culture America loves appropriating black culture — even when black people themselves, at times, don’t receive much love from America. From dreadlocks to dashikis, white America has taken black traditions and used them for their own gain by failing to give proper credit, ignoring historical context or blatantly perpetuating stereotypes. Culture denotes to the sum of the total values, norms and beliefs of a given group of people. It defines the group and differentiates itself from other groups. Cultural elements, such as language, defines the day to day characteristics of a group of people.…

    • 471 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Some blacks do not want to hear about their race and whites do not want to hear what their ancestors have done. The questions that will be addressed in this paragraph will be “Why did Woodson place so much value on teaching black history? what had been taught about African culture and history in public schools? And lastly, what is his critique of black colleges? Woodson teaches that the “most inviting field for discovery and invention is the Negro himself (p.139).…

    • 1046 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Myrick, it is about how the relative importance of African students at different points in their African identity development were analyzed. It talked about self hate and how african americans just feel like they can’t learn certain things because thats how the schools make them feel. In the African literacy study, certain books were found to be more appropriate for college students at certain points in their African identity development. This relates to Dr. Woodson 's views on teachings in the african american culture and how we should go about it. “The Miseducation of the Negro argues that African Americans must utilize their own cultural tools to think and work their way into better socioeconomic positions.” From, Thoughts on Carter G. Woodson’s: The Mis-education of a negro, Ciara Miller.…

    • 1199 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Dubois Color Line Essay

    • 1378 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Du Bois Johnson 2 Du Bois explained that social change is possible for African Americans if they could achieve civic equality, the right to vote and the education of the youth. Alexis Rogers of Georgia State University states “ If these three fields were perfected within the African American community, the patriarchal color line that both economically and socially hindered the nation would give way to ideas of capitalism, progress, and eventually, reform” (Rogers: pp 4). VEIL & DOUBLE CONSCIOUSNESS The color line concept is connected to another Du Bois concept, “the veil”. Author Charles Peterson defines the veil as “the wall of racial repression that allocated lesser resources to Afri-US communities of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century and bestowed markers of inferiority upon the black people who live behind those lines” (Peterson: p 14). He used this concept to explain how racism affects the mind of both the black and the white.…

    • 1378 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Some of them were inequality, human rights, racism, but the most important issue was oppression. According to “A Black Pastor Looks at Black Theology,” by Roger Williams, black theology allows to go free if one is under limitations of their rights and abuse. In 1960s, religious beliefs became a tool that bounded people and gave them the strength to resist oppression and gain equal civil rights. As it was mentioned above, movement faded, so as a bond and beliefs of people. Theology has its significant figures, now and in the past.…

    • 939 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Decent Essays