Essay On Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder

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Attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, or A.D.H.D., is a psychological disorder— classified by deviant, distressful, and dysfunctional patterns of thoughts, feelings, or behaviors— of the brain that is caused by low levels of the neurotransmitter dopamine. Dopamine can be thought of as the motivation, cognition, and reward system. The main characteristics of this disorder are inattention, hyperfocus, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. To be diagnosed with A.D.H.D., a person who is seventeen and older must have at least five or more symptoms listed in the DSM-5—the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders is a tool used for classifying and diagnosing mental disorders—and those who are younger than seventeen must have six. The symptoms …show more content…
The diagnosis opens several opportunities for treatment and if the disorder is left untreated, then this could prove detrimental to not only their mental health, but their relationships, grades, and productivity in work and school environments. According to Tanya E. Froehlich, associate professor of developmental and behavioral pediatrics at the University of Cincinnati/Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center, untreated A.D.H.D. “often worsens academic, peer and family functioning, and is correlated with high rates of depression and anxiety, suicidal tendencies, substance abuse, school failure, criminality, accidents and mortality, as compared to the general population.” In other words, it is imperative that children are given a diagnosis because otherwise their needs are neglected and will fail to function at their best. By prolonging and choosing to not give the diagnosis, children are being denied the opportunity for …show more content…
As for the simply focusing on bettering executive function, I agree that it would greatly help children with ADHD but Hyperactivity and Inattention are not the only symptoms that qualify for a diagnosis. Medication is only one of several different treatment options and according to……….. However, this problem could be solved by making a more extensive evaluation for A.D.H.D..
To wrap this up, the diagnosis of A.D.H.D. is helpful to children overall because they would be unable to receive the support and treatment that they need to help them with the symptoms that interfere with several different aspects of their lives. Skills that they learn through behavioral therapy can help them manage their symptoms because pharmaceuticals aren’t magic pills that make the symptoms disappear. It’s imperative to get diagnosed because while A.D.H.D. doesn’t get worse, the impact of it on people’s lives

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