Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Essay

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Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder
In the 1990 's the disorders, Attention-Deficit Disorder, which shortened is A.D.D., and Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, also known as A.D.H.D., was officially combined into one disorder which is Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, which is also known as A.D/H.D. Although many people today still call the disorder A.D.D. and A.D.H.D. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder mainly affects children and teens. It affects 3-5% of the children in school, although it is not unheard of an adult having A.D./H.D. The exact cause of A.D./H.D. is not yet known. A theory as to why it occurs is that a person 's genes could play a role. "Scientific evidence suggests that the disorder is genetically
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The three subtypes are inattentiveness, hyperactivity, and impulsivity. Victims may be inattentive and not hyperactive or impulsive, hyperactive and impulsive but not inattentive, or a combo of all three inattentive, impulsive, and hyperactive. Signs normally appear in victims before the age of seven. Signs of inattentiveness are they don 't pay attention to detail, makes careless mistakes, has trouble staying focused, seems not to listen when spoken to, has difficulty remembering things, has trouble staying organized, planning ahead, finishing projects, gets bored with a task before they finish it, constantly loses important things like homework, books, toys, and other things (Smith, Robinson, and Segal), low grades, procrastination, avoids normal tasks, and has a "narrator" constantly talking and narrating things (Worthley …show more content…
In School Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder tend to have more difficulty in school because in school children are expected to sit there for eight hours listening to lectures, watching videos, taking notes, and taking tests while at the same time sitting there not making very much noise and not moving around. Children with A.D./H.D. tend to do worst in classes like Science, Math, and English where they have to remember things like formulas and vocabulary whereas they tend to do better in classes that they have to use their imaginations and their hands, such as wood shop, auto mechanics, and art classes (Worthley X). A tactic that could help victims in school, and in life in general, is using S.MA.R.T. goals which are specific, measurable, achievable, realistic, and timed. It helps the victim have a specific goal to work towards and a specific time that they have to finish it by. Other systems that can help victims get their school work done is reduce distractions, recording their thoughts, choosing specific rituals to help relax them like meditating which might be challenging at first, use sticky notes for reminders, using a highlighter when reading books, rewards for completing goals, have a good filing system, practice being an active listener, keeping things that they use constantly in the same spot, break large tasks into smaller ones, creating a "procedure" to help them remember everything they have to do, and using colored highlighters to

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