Martin Luther's Separation Of The Catholic Church

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Martin Luther was a very influential person not only of his time, but also in the centuries to come. He is the reason why most of us call ourselves Protestants and why we are so grateful for the salvation we have through faith, not works.

Martin Luther was born in Eisleben, Saxony (now Germany) which was part of the Holy Roman Empire. His parents’ were Hans and Margaretta Luther. His father was a very hard working businessman and at an early age his family of 10 moved to Mansfeld. At the very young age of five Luther had begun his education at a local school where he learned three things: Latin, reading, and writing. During his teen years at age 13, he went to the school run by the Brethren of the Common Life in Magdeburg. The Brethren
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We could have been still under the thought of Papal Rule because it sparked an interest in people’s minds to have the separation of the church and the state. We would not have the right to worship our Father how we would want to choose. Selling indulgences and no liberties and the world maybe would even be ruled by the Pope and other Monarchs (even though there is still a Pope, he doesn’t have complete power). There were also many small short-term impacts that made a huge long-term change in the future of how the believers worship and practice today. Luther’s bold thoughts eventually changed the view of how people saw God and had relationship with Him. People started to realize that they didn’t need someone to go and ask for forgiveness from God for them, but they could do that themselves and could pray by …show more content…
He is most notably known for sparking the Protestant Reformation and breaking apart the “Holy” Catholic Church. His main teachings were founded in the New Testament and can be summarized in verses such as Ephesians 2:8-9. It says, “For by grace you have been saved through faith, and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God, not of works, lest any man should boast.”. Romans 6:23 says, “For the wages of sin is death, but the free ggift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.”. His writing, based on the Word of God alone and not mens’ added requirements brought about significant religious reforms, separation from the Catholic Church and division within it as well.

In conclusion, Martin Luther was indeed a man who stood up and made a difference in the world of his day. It would impact centuries to come. This all came to be because he challenged the Catholic Church and point out their errors and proved them wrong about their beliefs by understanding the Word of God. His name will never be forgotten. We can all learn from Martin Luther to read and study the Word of God. It is life changing. And, if something is not Biblical in your society or church bring it up, stand up, back it up and bring your opinions

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