Martin Luther's Disobedience

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The thesis of this paper is to discuss the obedience of Martin Luther despite the ridicule and distain of the public. His love and respect for God was unshaken during the reformation despite his feelings towards himself. God created us to serve and worship him. Many individuals have a problem with obedience and keeping Gods commandments, yet they claim to love him. Martin Luther loved God yet, he struggled with his own spirituality. Many people in the church have similar feelings. They want to please God, but they believe that they are not living up to his standard of holiness. It seems that they feel they need to achieve spiritual perfection, however,, the only perfect man to walk the Earth was Jesus. Martin Luther shared in thee struggles. …show more content…
He took his love for the Lord and ability to learn to a place of personal revelation. This is especially true as he gained knowledge as he studied the letters written by the Apostle Paul. God's truth broke through during his learning experiences and Luther came to the overwhelming time of awakening believing that he was truly saved by grace through faith alone (Ephesians 2:8 ). When he began to teach as a professor of biblical theology at the University of Wittenberg, his new found enthusiasm began to spill over into his lectures and discussions with staff and faculty. Luther spoke with great passion about Christ's role as the only mediator between God and man. He also taught that by grace and not through works, are men justified and forgiven of sin. Salvation, Luther now felt with all assurance, was God's free gift. It was no time before people began to notice and speak of the radical ideas that Luther had proposed. Not only did these revelations of God's truth change Luther's life, they would forever change the direction of church …show more content…
Muller has been the most vigorous proponent in a movement among some Reformation-era scholars. This idea affirms the works of seventeenth century Protestant scholasticism or Protestant Orthodoxy as the first satisfactory culmination, if not the epitome, of the Reformation as a whole. Also, Muller believes the best modern Protestant theology has been shaped by Aristotelian methods. He also hypothesizes that rigor supported the emerging structure and the coherence of Protestant systematic theology. Muller argues, for instance, that any proper understanding of the Reformation must be made within the framework of a synthesis of Christian theology and Aristotle's

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