Consequences Of PTSD In Prisoners

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The cause and consequences of PTSD in prisoners The Nation Survey of American life has said that Americans who spend time in prison are two times as likely to suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. Criminals will claim they are experiencing some kind of mental health disorder but maybe they had a disorder before getting locked up. I do not think society should feel bad because a prisoner is experiencing PTSD, to me that is just a consequence to the chain of events they started. There are many things that occur during life and some of those events could lead someone to suffer the effects of PTSD. A person could have grown up in a violent home setting, suffered substance abuse, been raped or witnessed a traumatic experience. PTSD could …show more content…
This could happen to you or you could witness it happening to someone else. Someone could experience nightmares, or flashbacks of the event that occurred. With all the new research coming out and saying prisoners get PTSD in prison; it is like we should feel bad for them or something. Unless they go and murder someone or committed a heinous crime you don’t find yourself sent to prison on a small offense. Criminals have to keep getting arrested to end up in prison and the lack of self-control they have shown, says a lot about who they are. They are more likely to engage in criminal behavior and completely know what consequence that would lead to. My personal opinion is PTSD is the least they should have to suffer from; no one stops and realizes what the victim suffers from everyday. The prisoner did not consider his action if he killed someone or what their family is going through. Even it is a theft charge, the victim might have lost a house, old family jewelry that they can never get back. Look at what happens to children being molested, they do not ever come back from that, but the prisoner wants to claim PTSD because someone raped in while being in prison. I would think that is even justice or divine intervention at work, they have to suffer from nightmares or flash back on a daily …show more content…
The only thing that brings PTSD on in prisoner is because of the freedom and life that just got taken away. Studies have shown that some inmates do not cope will with imprisonment, and that traumatic event encountered in prison may result in 9 maladaptive response including emotional disorders (Adams,1992; Bonta and Gendreau 1987; Guthrie, 1999). Now they want to add that learned helplessness while being in prison is linked to PTSD, we are stretching that too far, it is called institutionalized. If someone is locked up for years and forgets how to make certain choices, that is only a consequence to his earlier

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