The Canadian Magazine Dispute Case Study

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Running Head: The Canadian Magazine Dispute 1

The Canadian Magazine Dispute
Student
University of the People

The Canadian Magazine Dispute 2
To what extent do you think the U.S.-Canadian magazine dispute was motivated by genuine desires to protect Canadian culture?
Canada has a deep and abiding passion to safeguard their heritage. Nearly one hundred years of persistent advocacy continue to permeate the land to defend their right to block all efforts to disintegrate their home-grown ideals. The publication disagreement is just another step in the fight to preserve Canadian ideals (Globalization 101. n.d., p. 17).
In 1920, Canada’s legislative body shielded its country by charging essential tolls that international
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One major area of concern was linguistic intrusions. Portions of Canada engage in French conversations, therefore rules were designed to promote the security of their vernacular. English enterprises had to model cultural sensitivity by creating French-English signs with major, enlarged emphasis on the French. (Globalization 101. n.d., p. 25). These mandates would be of great concern in the publications industry. Split-run magazines need to include much more than Canadian announcements. Major efforts to create bilingual journals should penetrate the U.S. mindset.
And if Canadians seem to prefer buying American magazines, shouldn’t they be allowed to “vote” with their purchasing habits?
Democratic ideals should pervade every nation. There is a wonder in the freedom to express yourself in a way that can create a better society for you and your family. The right to buy what you want when you want should be your choice unless your decision and actions bring harm to others. But Canadians should also be concerned about ethinical endurance. Loss of heritage can negatively impact generations for decades. Vigorous cultural preservation should be in the heart of every Canadian.
I will always grieve over the genocide of my African culture. There was no choice when so many were snatched from their homeland and lost cultural roots and identity. The loss
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The purchase of international magazines should be allowed if transnationals print culturally sensitive materials. It takes serious collaborative efforts to strike a balance that will be productive and effective for everyone involved. Canada should thrive through internal country support and international enrichment. None of us can survive alone. We need community and support to live well-balanced lives.
If you were the Canadian government, trying to protect the domestic magazine market. What kind of criteria would you establish to distinguish between a split-run and a domestic magazine?
Domestic magazines would have Canadian writers who have the ability to write culturally sensitive articles that support Canadian heritage. The domestic magazines must be

The Canadian Magazine Dispute 5 owned by Canadians and discuss Canadian content. Canadian-based publications would also be published in Canada (Globalization 101. n.d., p. 18).
Split-run magazines would be U.S. owned or possessed by some other transcontinental location. I would want split-run magazines to have at least fifty percent Canadian content with fifty percent of the staff natives of Canada (Globalization 101. n.d., p.

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