Charter Of Rights And Freedoms Essay

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The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms can be seen as all-encompassing, and yet, it does not dictate the rules to follow regarding a major component of each person’s life: employment. Or does it? A vast portion of our lives in Canada is spent working, and regardless of the work environment, we interact with other people who may or may not come from the same backgrounds and ideologies as we do. With no specific terminology in the Charter that includes employment law, we must look between the lines and find the connections that lay within.
The Charter provides the roadmap for Canadian principles and social values; it lays out the rights and freedoms we have as a people, and promotes the protection of those human rights through its laws. Employment law is not addressed directly in the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, however, our constitutional rights and freedoms affect all aspects of our lives as Canadians. As well, other statutes - such as the Ontario Human Rights Code - must abide by the Charter and therefore conform to the equal rights of all peoples in the law and equal protection and benefit of the law. The Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms section 15 stipulates these equality rights
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A main component of the latter which applies to employment law is the anti-discrimination legislation and other statutory protections, which tie directly into the equality rights of the former. Together, these laws regulate and govern how people are to interact with others and how they should expect to be treated in Canada. Through these similar qualities the Charter of Rights and Freedoms relates directly to the Ontario Human Rights Code and both jointly apply to employment law and the protection of

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