The Anzac Legend

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World War one began on July 28th, 1914 and ended on the 11th of November 1918. It started off with a local war between Austria Hungary and Serbia. It developed into a war which involved 32 countries. Empires like the Great Britain, Germany, Austria Hungary and Russia took over many territories, and were fearful of others invasion towards their newly marked lands. Thus, countries began culturing alliances with one another. Australia, is one of the many countries that were involved in WWI. Many people believe the Anzac legend contains the characteristics of courage, endurance, initiative, discipline and mateship. However, after thorough research, the Anzac legends are an exaggerated form of what happened in reality. Aspects of the suppose identity …show more content…
This primary source has evident that the suppose courage and endurance are mostly an exaggerated form of reality, and had showcased the mythical ‘secret evacuation’, the drip guns. The drip gun method was used to help the Australian soldiers to evacuate safely. However, according to professor Stanley: “By the time the first one went off all of the troops had been evacuated.” (Scurry, 1963). The thought of evacuating has opposed the meaning of courage and endurance. Moreover, the initiative of the legend has also seemed to be overemphasised. Conferring to another primary evident it reads: “Australian soldiers believed, too, that they were victims of their own officers' officiousness.” (Blair, 1998). Instead of acting up and as an independent, the officers of the Australian troop had taken over, forcing their orders to be …show more content…
Ellis Ashmead Bartlett of the daily telegraph, was an experienced correspondent. He has been trying to tell the public of British the occurring events in the battlefields. But unfortunately his dispatches of the Gallipoli has been censored and often never appeared on print. A plausible website stated: “Maxwell, on instructions from Hamilton, would allow no criticism of the conduct of the operation, no indication of set-backs or delays, and no mention of casualty figures.” (Jovanovich, 1975) Different from Bartlett, Peter Williams a Canberra-based primary historian, had hid away the truth of deserting Australian soldiers. William views contends on the first group of Australian that landed at the Anzac cove, to be deserting away from the battle. Referring to an informative website: Desertion sits uneasily with the idea of a legend. In place of it, the euphemism "stragglers" was instituted to save face.” (Bantick, 2010). However, the term ‘stragglers’ still didn’t satisfy William and it certainly still did not suit the legend of courage, so it has been edited out.
In conclusion, above all have demonstrated the exaggeration of the Anzac legend. The 3 key points of the identities of the Anzac legend, contradictory actions performed by the Australian soldiers, and hidden truths, came to a conclusion of the overemphasised legend of the Anzac. Actions of the Asutralian soldiers have opposed the meaning of,

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