Tactics Of Malcolm X

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Throughout history’s fight for black equality, there have numerous individuals in which have decided to take a stand and forever change the world; Malcolm X is no exception to this. His methods to achieve Civil Rights for African Americans were both controversial yet struck home with many blacks tired of waiting defenceless. It is to a moderate extent that his methods were successful in his use of various tactics such as pro-violence and the encouragement of critical thinking about racial problems around the world.

Malcolm X’s most known and used method was his violent protests against their white oppressors. A main aspect of X’s beliefs came through the Nation Of Islam. While being sentenced to 10 years in prison, he converted to the religion
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He connected with other oppressed blacks outside the USA and allowed for greater unity between other persecuted people. His thinking inspired one of the most influential people, Muhammed Ali. Originally named Cassius Clay, he looked up to X for spiritual and political guidance. He soon became one of the first successful black athletes to embrace his racial pride and willingly criticize white establishments. Through the help of Ali, black pride was able to be shown to the public by a figure most looked up to; gaining greater acceptance and sympathy for the cause. X also became an iconic role model for blacks youths due to his actions taken up in keeping the black ghettos in the public eye. By doing so, more blacks joined the cause allowing for further activity to be noticed by white governments. X himself was raised in a black ghetto in harlem which lead to further crime and his arrestment in 1946. In jail, the library became his sanctuary where he read vigorously, educating himself in not only literature but political affairs. This method X used extremely successfully, was due to his insistence on African Americans to educate themselves, and not to fill white stereotypes. This created a more equal fighting board against the whites, by having cultured and intelligent blacks fighting for their freedom. His quote “You don’t have to be a man to fight for …show more content…
This method of trying to improve the rights and lives of African Americans and putting them above whites did not work to his advantage. It created more tension and divided the nation on deciding to give rights to blacks. This is one of his major approaches to the civil rights movement that ended in both extreme criticism and failure on X’s part. It was not the best way to proceed into the future for coming generations to view as if whites and blacks are ‘different races’. His use of such imprudent aims did not allow him to have strong, intimate political connections with any authoritative figures unlike Dr King. Therefore he wasn’t able to work with governments to gain rights through the use of legal means. Despite not having connections to white governments, he did appear on various radio and TV programs and was invited to numerous University debates across the country due to his controversial views and radical methods of achieving these. His personality, opinionated and outspoken along with his oratorical gifts was a reason he had so many followers. What he was preaching made sense to not only to black muslims but to people tired of being denied their rights as American citizens.. He openly criticized President Kennedy in how he dealt with certain situations such as the Birmingham Crisis in 1963 by saying “he is wrong because his motivation is wrong.” However, his pro-separatism view was the reason

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