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Case Study Stan
Introduction:
The evaluation of Stan who is a 35-year-old divorced white male that is attending counseling for drinking issues. Stan describes himself as a loner with self-esteem issues, he also admits he has a drinking problem, but feels he is not addicted to alcohol. He also states he is not a very social person even though he tries to have friends. However, he feels his drinking gets in the way of his friendships, especially when he exceeds his limits. Stan has this over whelming sense that he feels worthless and not on the same level as his peers. His biggest fear is what people think and say about him as he interacts with others trying to build relationships. Stan was married for a short time to Joyce, who was an overpowering
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Stan felt like he was always being compared to his older sister and brother by his father, Frank sr. His father made it sound to Stan like he could never do anything correct and what he did do was not as good as his siblings. The relationship with his younger brother was one of constant fighting and Stan feeling that his parents also paid more attention to the youngest child. This constant feeling of not doing things up to his family’s standards has also contributed to Stan’s self-esteem issues. Stan’s relationship with his mother was just as hard as the one with his father. His mother would always say things like “why can you grow up and be a man”, things are much better around here when you’re not …show more content…
Stan would be able to self-direct himself between what he wants and what he is. In this therapy focus is given the here and now and expressing feelings on what is being experienced.
Goals
The main goal for Stan is to help him recognize the meaning of life and to find a way to fully experience it. This therapy will help Stan break down the walls that have been blocking him from becoming the person he is striving to be. The person-centered therapy allows the client and therapist to have a very genuine and warm relationship that shows respect along with being nonjudgmental.
The next therapy that I would like to expose Stan to be choice theory/Reality therapy which for the therapist is to create a good relationship with Stan. This will help Stan find what Stan wants, what they are choosing to do and help them make the changes needed to improve their way of life. This therapy works if the client is willing to attempt to behave responsibly.

Key Concepts The basic idea is to work with the client and to help guide them with, whether their actions on fixing the issues at hand are working for them. This theory/therapy is to help the client be motivated towards their needs to have a healthy relationship with

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