Analysis Of Chimpanzees By Jane Goodall

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In the early 1960’s Jane Goodall traveled to the Gombe Stream Reserve in Tanzania to study chimpanzee development and their social interactions. During her early years of study, Goodall discovered much about the social complexity of chimpanzee societies and their hierarchies, along with their development which is, for the most part, very similar to the development of our species. Throughout the book, Jane Goodall describes the many challenges she faced trying to get the protective chimpanzees accepting of her presence in their territories, as well as the strong human to chimp relationship formed between the two alike species.
Unsurprisingly, given that we share ninety-nine percent of our DNA with chimpanzees, Goodall’s findings can relate
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Ainsworth’s studies found that a human infant or toddler may act in various ways when her mother is not present, and then respond positively or negatively towards the mother when she comes back into the room. The same with chimps. When Jane was studying a strange relationship between an indifferent mother and her attached daughter, she observed something similar to the nature of secure attachment. When a young chimp is playing games with others similar in age, it is very hard for their mothers to persuade their offspring to leave a game when they themselves are ready to move on. This particular chimpanzee’s mother had no difficulty in trying to get her daughter to leave because she was so terrified in being left behind. Sometimes, the infant would immediately leave her game if she saw her mother was about to get up and go too. Because this youngster was so securely attached to her mother, she would become upset and nervous when her mother left, and playfully happy, exploring her environment- but still in within view of her mother when in close …show more content…
I am truly astonished at the fact that although we are very genetically similar to the chimpanzee, some aspects of our human nature did not carry on into the evolution of a human. Although the chimpanzee society does impose certain rules of conduct, such as how to act when in the presence of a high-ranking individual, it imposes far fewer rules than those in our human society. A human will learn early in life the norms of his society and how to behave. Therefore, he or she will inhibit their behavior in certain social contexts, whereas chimpanzees will be intimidated by the idea that they may “make a fool of

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