Sigmund Freud's Ideas Of Evil

Great Essays
EVIL
Evil has always coexisted with civilization, and they simultaneously evolve over time. This coevolution, however, raises a question. Is evil truly evil? Or is it, perhaps, merely a product of what society feels everyone should be against? If evil were just evil, then it would have never evolved from witches and demons to drugs and gang violence. So who does decide what evil is during a certain period of time? And who decides when these "evil" things are not evil anymore? Although it is pretty obvious that causing harm to others is evil, it is only immoral in the eyes of society, not in the eyes of the one taking action. This is because the mind, or self, is comprised of the conscious and the subconscious.
There are many concepts of evil.
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Morality is the product of society. He believed that the subconscious mind is one-self without the awareness of society's morality, one's true self. The subconscious mind is one's instinct (notes). To further examine these concepts of evil, it is best to apply Freud's discoveries to other views on society. Philosopher Jean-Jacque Rousseau believed that, as human beings, "our greatest evils come from ourselves," (notes) which helps tie into Freud's theory of the subconscious mind. Rousseau was also against the basic Christian view which states that humans are sinful by nature. He instead believed that humans are good by nature in their uncivilized, or unassociated with society, environment. Rousseau argued that fake political systems, such as tyrannies, were the source for man wanting to cause harm; he also argued that society is responsible for creating such civilizations …show more content…
meaning he's psychologically incompetent. Both Lady Macbeth and Macbeth committed acts that would be deemed as evil in any given society. Their disregard for the consequences of their actions, however, show that they were not in their right mind, even if they were aware of the consequences. Lady Macbeth's carelessness began to diminish, and she soon began to feel guilt and remorse, which eventually led to her taking of her own life. As Rousseau believed, Lady Macbeth and Macbeth, or anyone who has ever killed to get power, would most likely have never felt the thirst for power if it had not been for society's evolution that led to create a political system such as the tyranny in the play. If it had not been for the Pagan society influencing Grendel's development, he would have never seen evil acts take place and thus would perhaps never feel the need to do the same. Therefore, it can be concluded that, evil is in the eye of the beholder. That beholder is society. Inevitably, however, the choice of one's actions, good or evil, is up to

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