Sigmund Freud's 5 Factor Model Of Personality

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Personality is defined as an individual’s regular forms of behavior, feelings, and thought processes.

The 5-Factor Model of Personality underlines the five fundamental trait features of personality shared between every individual over time and culture. The 5-Factor Model of Personality is spelled out in the acronym, OCEAN:

1. Open to experience, which describes the person who is curious, adventurous and willing to accept new ideas and concepts.
2. Conscientious, which describes a person who is self-disciplined and a diligent achiever.
3. Extraversion, which describes a person who has a positive outlook on things and enjoys being around others.
4. Agreeableness, which describes a person who is compassionate and works along well
…show more content…
The id is the basis of what drives our unconscious drives and desires. The ego is the conscious controller and determines how and when we make important decisions. The superego is our conscience, a symbol of morality and what drives us to do what’s right less we feel guilty.

Defense mechanisms are unconscious psychological strategies that are used to manage anxiety and to have a positive outlook on one’s life, avoiding low self-esteem.
Freud’s 5 stages of psychosexual development begins with the oral stage, where pleasure is experienced by mouth; the anal stage, where pleasure is brought forth from bowel and bladder elimination; the phallic stage, where pleasure comes from the genitals; latency, where sexual feelings subside and they become less important; and the genital stage, where sexual maturity is fully reached if all prior stages have been in place.

Bandura and Mischel both believed in the notion that interactions between environmental factors, cognition and behavior all influence personality.

Humanistic psychologists focus on how the beliefs, motivations, and feelings we have about ourselves drive our

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