Compare And Contrast Sigmund Freud And Erikson's Psychosexual Theory Of Development

Improved Essays
Essay on
Sigmund Freud’s Psychosexual theory of development and Erik Erikson’s
Psychosocial theory of development
Introduction:
This essay is done as a part of Adolescence & Learning (module 0765) assignment. The main areas which is covered in the project include comparison between Freud’s Psychosexual theory of development and Erikson’s Psychosocial theory of development. Moreover, the critical analysis of both the theories are clearly mentioned in the assignment as well.
Overview of the both theories:
Both Freud and Erickson believed that the individual developed in stages and that much of people's development occurred early in life. According to Freud’s theory, the development is sexual as
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Therefore the key idea lay behind his theory is framed is that the individual faces a conflict at each stage, which may or may not be successfully resolved within that stage. The psychosocial stages of the theory includes Trust vs. Mistrust, Autonomy vs. Shame and Doubt, Initiative vs. Guilt and Industry vs.
Inferiority.
Comparisons between Freud and Erikson theory of development
As mentioned by Rounday (2015), she suggested that Sigmund Freud's psychosexual theory and
Erik Erikson's psychosocial theory are two important psychoanalytic theories on human development where both theories recognize the importance of the unconscious on development.
They separated development into stages of a person's life and utilize similar age divisions for these developmental stages.
In addition to this, Prabhat (2011), he stressed, Freud believed that an individual’s identity developed during adolescence. Erikson believed, however, that an individual’s identity developed and evolved throughout a person’s life. Unlike Freud’s thoughts that maturation had an important role, Erikson placed more importance to the cultural demands on a
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His theory in comparison to Freud's varied in a number of different ways.
Erikson's theory emphasized how both early and late experiences are equally important to a person's development and how personality continued to develop beyond puberty. Whereas, Freud argued that most development took place during the earlier period of an individual's life (Cherry,
2015). Freud's psychosexual stages consist of five stages and he does not expand any further than puberty. Erikson's first few psychosocial stages are slightly similar to that of Freud's stages one to three. Erikson also expands his developmental stages to eight. The main similarity with two theories is that the id, ego and super ego play important roles in the developmental stages.
Adolescence & Learning, Assignment – 01 2015
4 MOHAMED SHIFAAU, ID: 5789
However, there are several differences that exist between the theories even with the names of the stages. Freud's psychosexual theory emphasizes the importance of basic needs and biological forces, while Erikson's psychosocial theory is based upon social and environmental

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