Sigmund Freud's Psychosocial Development

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Introduction
This assignment is based on comparison and contrast of Sigmund Freud’s psychosexual theory and Erik Erikson’s psychosocial theory of developments. In this assignment I have given a brief introduction of psychosexual development theory and psychosocial developmental theory. I have included similarities and differences of both the theories. I have also included the advantages and disadvantages of both theories. In addition to that a short conclusion is also given on both theories.

Introduction of psychosexual development theory and psychosocial development theory
To understand some of the important issues in developmental psychology, development theories are important. Developmental psychology is the scientific
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The two theories are of the stand that human development occurs in a series of predetermined stages. Freud and Erikson, both believed that the child’s personality depends on a success in going through all stages. However, there are many differences existing between the theories such as the names of the stages and the developmental issues. Freud’s theory describe the development only based on sexuality, whereas; in Erikson’s theory , he gives a description of the impact that social experience has across an individual’s entire life through environment factors. Another distinguished difference in these two theories is Erikson’s theory includes an additional three stages as opposed to Freud’s five stages of …show more content…
In this theory Erik Erikson provides a broad integrative framework and explains culture and environmental influence and their affects towards development of an individual’s life. However, he placed less importance on individuals’ sexual drives as a factor in normal development. He also downplayed the importance of maturation in cognitive development.
Freud, in his psychosexual theory, he has drawn attention to the possible long-term effects of traumatic events in childhood.
However, there are some of the weaknesses of Sigmund Freud’s psychosexual theory. Firstly this theory focused mostly on male development. Secondly, concepts such as the libido, the unconscious mind are impossible to measure, and therefore cannot be tested scientifically. Thirdly, Freud based his theory on the recollections of his adult patients, not on actual observation and study of children. Finally Freud’s theory is based on case study instead of empirical

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