Self Control In The Yellow Wallpaper

Improved Essays
“The Yellow Wallpaper”
The feeling of freedom is a mental awareness that people take for granted. When a person becomes aware of its restrictions they begin to feel departed or feel like they don’t matter. With a person with an anxiety or depression disorder they already feel the sense of being unknown. Where performing activities keeps their mind off the issue they developed. In the story of “The Yellow Wallpaper” by Charlotte Perkins Gilman, the concern of an individual’s ability to be free and unconstrained is discussed about. Jane is married to her husband John and have just moved into a new estate. The estate has been empty for a long time due reasons that were unclear to Jane. She has been suffering from post-partum depression before they moved in to the estate. John sees her depression as insignificant and not something to be concerned with. The
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Jane’s self-control ultimately led to her insanity since losing self-control causes the mind to overpower itself. Jane is placed in an environment with that had mental limitations. Jane therefore kept a secret journal to relieve her mind, but the mind can only reason with what they have. Jane had herself, John, and the room she was forced to remain In. John’s ignorance and Jane’s imprisonment lead Jane to fantasize and imagine. The time she spent in the room made her illness worse since she had no way to express herself. Jane was left with one power, her imagination. Jane identified herself as desperate woman trapped with no means to get out. The restrictions led to Jane’s insanity since leaving a mentally ill patient alone means they have no cure. The cure was to provide Jane her authority back but John believed complete dormancy stood as the precise method. Symbolically the organization of how Jane’s life was depicted through the wallpaper, was the domestic living that all woman is trapped

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