Jane Eyre And The Yellow Wallpaper Analysis

1285 Words 6 Pages
In a world where men often have power over women, it is essential that women heed Ephron’s advice: “Above all, be the heroine of your life, not the victim.” According to Spivak, the person with the most power in the relationship is the “Self”, and the “Other” has little power in comparison (Spivak in Rodenburg 7th lecture). In this essay I will discuss the ways in which the roles of Other are negotiated by Jane Eyre and Jane in Jane Eyre, and “The Yellow Wallpaper” respectively. I will argue that Jane Eyre resists otherness more effectively than Jane by asserting her independence through challenging and then leaving Rochester, in comparison Jane resists otherness, but fails to separate herself from the Self, which leads to further disempowerment. …show more content…
Consequently, John asserts himself as the leader of the relationship, and treats Jane as though she were a child. For this reason, Jane states repeatedly that she feels trapped, this because “if a physician of high standing, and one’s own husband, assures friends and realities that there is nothing the matter… what is one to do” (Gilman 76). Jane is constantly asking, “what can one do?” (Gilman 76) this demonstrates how perplexed Jane gets, to the point where she is pushed to her breaking point. Accordingly, Jane has no way to express her emotions and thoughts, since there is no one who will believe her. John throughout the short story belittles Jane over her illness saying “she’ll be as sick as she pleases” (Gilman 82), making her illness seem made up, and not a big deal. Moreover, Jane tells the readers that “he doesn’t believe I’m sick” (Gilman 76), proving that John does not believe Jane has the knowledge to understand her own emotions, and well-being. Jane starts to take charge in the short story, when John pushes Jane to her …show more content…
Nonetheless Jane has resisted in various ways, one by telling John what she thinks will make her better “if I had less opposition and more society and stimulus” (Gilman 76). Jane tries to help John understand that she wants to be with friends, and not locked up in an old house. Also, Jane resists otherness by writing, as it is a way to escape from her reality, this allows her to talk about her illness without conflict. Furthermore, Jane realizes “John does not know how much I really suffer. He knows there is no reason to suffer, and that satisfies him” (Gilman 77) meaning, Jane understands John will continue to demean her illness, due to him believing she is pretending to be ill. John pushes Jane to her breaking point and she contemplates jumping out of her second story bedroom window, “but, the bars are to strong, to even try” (Gilman 86). Jane resists otherness, but fails to separate herself from the John’s Self, leading to further disempowerment. Jane, through a constant effort of trying to get John to understand her illness, was unable to resist otherness successfully, by separating herself from John and not being able to feel

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