Compare And Contrast Piadgeon And The Great Gatsby

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Similarities/differences between critics (Ronald Berman and John. A Pidgeon)

*It may be brief

About Fitzgerald’s America

Pidgeon explains further through his criticism of Fitzgerald’s view of America, how it is not only the illusion of America but also Gatsby’s “flaw” regarding “his “faith” in mankind and in America, which has blinded his intelligence and judgement.” Fitzgerald views America as “a tragedy traditionally torn between the two forces of optimism and pessimism of idealism and practicality, of faith and reality, and of romanticism and realism.” However, in my opinion, I feel that Pidgeon has interpreted Fitzgerald’s America inaccurately, supporting his point revolving around the democracy system instead – “the clash of ideals
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What if Fitzgerald’s America is an inaccurate representation of the time? Although the American society in Fitzgerald’s America Dream may be living a luxurious life, consequences potentially result with the support of the green light. Berman (1994) explains how materialism in the society is the main cause of destruction to the American dream by “infecting all branches of thought”, and how commercialism is “infecting all branches of action”. Ever since the post war, the society has been welcomed and brainwashed by “seditious elements, ignorant, boisterous, treacherous, and dangerous” ideas characterised as “new languages and thoughts into our population in immense quantities, interpenetrating and contaminating it in many ways”. Berman (1994) later explains the result of the maximised level of consumerism, “the tone of the public mind is to a woeful extent sordid, selfish, greedy.” This depicts the dangers of excessive level of consumerism, how there is a limit although the American Dream appears “limitless”, creating an unhealthy environment. Nick Carraway explains how “Gatsby believed in the green light, the orgiastic future that year by year recedes before us. It eluded us then, but that’s no matter — tomorrow we will run faster, stretch out our arms farther…” (page 259, The Great Gatsby). He is living in the illusion of the American Dream, and not reality, where to be successful, he must …show more content…
The dream is destroyed by Gatsby’s death as he experiences “face to face with reality”, while “Tom and Daisy and millions of other small – minded, ruthless Americans believe only in the value of material things, with no room for faith and vision.” The viewpoints of these critics explain the dangers of consumerism within the society. Money may buy happiness and luxury nonetheless, it does not make a powerful society and opens to failures. However, I disagree that the American dream is destructive as it is the opposite of the American Dream in the 1920s. Although the society is heavily involved in consumerism, if they all had a goal and worked for it, their effort may have a positive and successful impact on the outcome which consequently lead to wealth. Fitzgerald has portrayed the idea of the America Dream as a failure rather than a peaceful illusion, as he did not believe in the American Dream, making me reconsider my hypothesis that Fitzgerald’s America is the accurate representation of the

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