Corruption Of The American Dream In The Great Gatsby By F. Scott Fitzgerald

903 Words 4 Pages
The corruption of the American Dream is a prevalent theme in classic literature, as it highlights the falsified illusions of social mobility and power commonly promoted during the early twentieth century. The motivation for socio-economic inclination is generally consumed by materialism and shallowness in an effort to satisfy the constant lack of self fulfillment, which inevitably leads to self destruction. Many people blindly accept the idealistic concept of social and economic mobility only to discover its unattainableness. In The Great Gatsby, F. Scott Fitzgerald explores the corruption underlying the pursuit of the American Dream through Jay Gatsby. In an effort to captivate Daisy’s attention, Jay Gatsby publicly displays his wealth and …show more content…
Despite evidence of Daisy’s shallowness, Gatsby’s unrealistic desire to restore the past ultimately blinds him to the reality of his destructive relationship, as his infatuated pursuit of Daisy consumes his identity. In an effort to assimilate into the aristocratic class, Gatsby reinvents his identity under the illusions of pre-established wealth, despite his actual humble upbringing. His pursuit of Daisy ultimately resulted in his own downfall, as she fails to take responsibility for her automobile accident that evoked Myrtle’s death. Gatsby’s innocent and inevitable death ultimately highlights the unattainability and corruption of the supposed American Dream. Gatsby’s infatuated pursuit of Daisy ultimately unveils his preexistent figurative blindness, thus his inevitable death illustrates the corruption underlying the American …show more content…
During a conversation with Nick, it becomes evident that the underlying motive for Gatsby’s pursuit of Daisy is the ability to assimilate into the aristocratic class, as he claims that “her voice is full of money” (Fitzgerald 120). Gatsby’s tone of admiration ultimately emphasizes his desire to achieve wealth and status that is comparable to that of Daisy Buchanan. In Gatsby’s perspective, Daisy is the ultimate symbol of the wealth and power promoted by the American Dream. Gatsby’s unrealistic and infatuated pursuit of Daisy unveils his immaturity, as he is fascinated with the fictional concept of Daisy, which prevents him from developing dynamically. In an effort to validate his pursuit of Daisy, Gatsby permits an inanimate object to develop a profound significance over his life. The green light emitted by Daisy’s mansion ultimately symbolizes hope and the American Dream for Gatsby. Through the emphasis of color symbolism, the green light ironically suggests that regardless of wealth and power, the aristocratic class continues to suffer from

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