The Rise Of Islamophobia

Improved Essays
A change in the paradigm might ascend in moments of grief and profound disarray. The end of the Cold War marked the end of the bipolar world, the expansion of the rapid mode of capitalist production and the permeating of globalization. However the most profound day in history that prompted the greatest shift in the international system was September 11th, 2001. The September 11th terrorist incursion on the World Trade Center in Lower Manhattan, New York City resonated a large kink in an already dubious and feeble international organization. The trauma that personified the American people after the terrorist invasion had sparked four existing movements in U.S. policy as a reaction to the ever-evolving dangerous world that neighbors them. Professor …show more content…
diplomatic interests because of the fear of backlash and the fomentation of anti-Muslim empty rhetoric. Islamophobia serves as a causal mechanism to the ever-evolving nature of these terrorist networks. Meddling within their sovereign country can be seen as a violation of international law unless authorization is given. However these terror networks are aware when a country violates their sovereign integrity, capitalizing on the opportunity to recruit more members to join their ruthless rogue terror networks. They see western civilization and democracy as the primary security threat to their country. Extremists use the opportunity to spew empty rhetoric to inhabitants within their country that Western civilization is enforcing their own interest upon our nation to relinquish an organization they know so little about. U.S. diplomacy has gone awry on numerous occasions, in regards to the nation of Iraq. Starting from the second Persian Gulf War, when the U.S. intervened themselves in an Arab-Arab conflict between Iraq and Kuwait which they served no purpose, later prompting economic sanctions and trade embargoes on Iraq, depriving their country from profiting economically as much as they desired. All sanctions were later lifted by 2003. Another example would be the invasion of Iraq in 2003 after the 9/11 terrorist attacks on American soil. However this invasion had not received Security Council approval; this can be seen as a violation of a country’s sovereign integrity. Moreover Al-Qaeda, Al-Nusra, and more recently the Islamic State reside predominantly in Iraq and Syria, occupying large swaths of territory and have formulated their own coalition against America and all Westernized

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