Rhetorical Analysis Of Brutus's Speech In Julius Caesar

Superior Essays
Register to read the introduction… He reminded the people that Caesar would have ruined Rome, become a tyrant and would have enslaved everyone, he said "had you rather Caesar were living, and die all slaves, than that Caesar were dead?". He says this as a rhetorical question: it has quite an obvious answer but probably would have been false anyway. Brutus says that last quote like it is fact and that it will happen. The fact makes it seem more real. Another example of a rhetorical question in Brutus's speech is when Brutus says "Who is here so vile that will not love his country?" In that last quote notice he started with "Who is here" He say that many times in the speech which is repetition for impact, he uses this to persuade the crowd. That device works as a list to make it seem like there were many reasons for the assassination and he keeps reinforcing his opinions with repetition. Brutus also explained that he didn't hate Caesar, but that he loved Rome more. He says "Not that I loved Caesar less, but I loved Rome more" this shows it would have been hard to kill Caesar, as he loved him, but he is so sure it is right he had to killed him. At one point, they wanted to crown Brutus, who intended for everyone to be …show more content…
In a sarcastic tone, Antony repeatedly referred to these "honourable men". Repeating "Honourable men" is also seen to be ironic, he's ridiculing Brutus and the conspirators saying his idea of Caesar being so ambitious, he's a threat, is something to laugh about.
Every time Antony cleverly pauses in his speech to let the plebeians comment, the plebeians are more spiteful toward the conspirators. As the crowd begins to favour Antony the citizens make comments like "Methinks there is much reason in his saying" which shows there change in opinion.
Antony said his speech, after Brutus so Antony could adapt to what Brutus has already said and even prove it wrong. He convinces the crowd that Caesar was great. The crowd would feel guilty about trusting Brutus, after Antony persuaded them he was almost pathetic, this makes the crowd angry and they rebel.
Antony also says "Here was Caesar! When comes such another?" which makes the citizens feel guilty and like they'll never get another Caesar, so they have missed there chance to let Caesar

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    “Not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more”(III,I,20). Brutus has to go slow with explaining the reasoning, because the people are angry and confused at why this hero they all love, killed the great Caesar. Antony’s use of repetition is along the same lines as Brutus’ but he is directing his compliments at Brutus. “(For Brutus is an honorable man; So are they all, all honorable men)”(III,ii,79-80). He ends most of his statements with calling Brutus honorable and good.…

    • 1002 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Antony, although a “loyal” follower, was power hungry and as soon as Caesar had died, Antony was planning on how to take the power for himself. In Julius Caesar, after Brutus makes the final stab, Antony states, “I doubt not of your wisdom./ Let each man render me his bloody hand.” (III.i.183-184). This makes it seem as though Antony is with the conspirators. Then when they funeral speeches take place Antony says, “O masters! if I were dispos’d to stir/ Your hearts and minds to mutiny and rage, I should do Brutus and Cassius wrong,/ Who (you all know) are honorable men.” (III.ii.119-122).…

    • 1075 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The use of foreshadowing in this phrase gives adds suspense into the story, as many began to feel hinted about the coming events in the story. By saying this Brutus claims that he won’t be the same leader as Caesar and that the people of Rome mean more to him than his own life. This is an emotional approach in order to convince the plebeians to believe that assassinating Caesar was a good thing. Another approach Brutus took to appeal to plebeians’ emotions was when he said, “There is tears for his love; joy for his fortune; honour for his valour; and death for his ambition,” (III. ii.…

    • 919 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    “...Age, thou art shamed! Rome, thou hast lost the breed of noble bloods! ...O, you and I have heard our fathers say, There was a Brutus once that would have brooked Th’ eternal devil to keep his state in Rome As easily as a king” (I,ii,150-161). Continuing through that a tragic hero must have a tragic flaw. Marcus Brutus has the tragic flaw of having poor judgment, because he so easily trusts people, such as the conspirators consequently causing Marcus to be ignorant and blind to the fact that they were planning to kill Caesar, not to better the government but for personal gain.…

    • 1701 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Since Brutus has these conflicting thoughts, Cassius is able to successfully persuade Brutus into joining the conspirators. During Cassius’ speech, he offers to Brutus, “I have heard / Where many of the best respect in Rome / (Except immortal Caesar), speaking of Brutus” (I.ii.58-60). These words of Cassius sway Brutus’ mind and he begins to think that killing Caesar is the right thing. Killing Caesar starts a chain reaction, and eventually leads to Brutus taking his own life. Later in the play when Cassius suggests killing Antony as well, Brutus denies his request.…

    • 1396 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The primary example of this manipulation in Julius Caesar is Brutus. Brutus is considered to be very noble by almost everyone in the play. Brutus wants to keep this image, and therefore he tries to convince himself that killing Caesar is the right thing to do. Caesar is his friend and it is very hard for Brutus to convince himself, but in the end with some help, he thinks that “it must be by [Caesar’s] death” that the Republic of Rome is saved (2.1.10). This manipulation causes Brutus to kill Caesar, thinking that Caesar is too ambitious, even though Caesar has not done much to show his ambition.…

    • 1052 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Cassius simply misleads Brutus into thinking killing Caesar is for the good of the Roman people. Yet Brutus does not simply immediately agree with Cassius, instead Brutus ponders what would happen to Caesar if he got the crown. Brutus wonders, “But, when he once attains the upmost round/He then unto the ladder turns his back” (JC II i 25-26). Brutus suggest that if Ceasar would be crowned he would forget where he came from and all his fellow friends, including him, and instead of acknowledging his fellow Romans would instead scorn them. Brutus puts a great deal of thought into his choices but at the same time he puts his entire private life on hold and entirely focuses on public matters.…

    • 1277 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Brutus gives his antithesis to claim his innocence and reasoning for the murder of Caesar by saying, “not that I loved Caesar less, but that I loved Rome more,” Julius Caesar (3.2. 21-22). Brutus presents this antithesis to draw an ethical and emotional response from the crowd because of the contrast between loving Caesar less and loving Rome more. The strength of this is that it creates a parallelism of words that are a juxtaposition of each other. It causes the plebeians to see and emphasize the distinctions of the ideas that they might of looked over.…

    • 1633 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Visual persuasion so far has helped Antony along well, but now adding verbal will only help him more by the end of this tragedy. By constantly repeating the word “honorable” , he was able to get the Romans to turn to an angry mob. He first used this type of persuasion in the beginning of his funeral speech. “For Brutus is an honorable man; So are they all, all honorable men” (3.2). By saying this, the phrase almost comes off as a question.…

    • 1153 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    Brutus Decides To Join The Conspiracy Against Caesar After His Realization To The Fact That The Roman Republican Government Was In Great Danger. 6B.Caesar Loves Calpurnia To Give Into His Wishes, But He Is Also Afraid Of Appearing Cowardly/Weak, Which Is Why He Doesn't Want Decius To Say He Was Sick. He Seems Rome As A Priority In Life. _______________________________________________________________________________________________ English Ii-2 Julius Caesar Act III Questions: 1. If I Was In The Crowd At Caesar's Funeral I Would Probably Also Be Riled Up And I Would Have Agreed With Antony Because Of The Way He Was Presenting Himself He Was So Noble.…

    • 1540 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays