Qualitative Methodology: Case Study

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METHODOLOGY

Introduction
This methodology will detail the research methods used within this study to examine and explore the issues raised within the literature review. It will discuss and justify the qualitative data analysis used during this case study.

Qualitative Approach to Research
Following the need to facilitate communication, language and literacy instruction for the EAL child within year one classroom (whose CL attainment is below ELGs), the emotive subject with regards to facilitation of linguistic provision through play within the national curriculum (2014) was highlighted. Therefore in conjunction with gaining a better understand of pedagogic philosophy and following extensive literature review, a qualitative approach to
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Such a paradigm is thought by Basit (2010) to enable a more hermeneutic phenomenology being gained through a holistic qualitative methodology. However although interpretive analysis can be conducted by an inside /outside researcher, Cohen, Manion & Morrison (2011) identify how to enable validity and to remain impartial a greater clarity through personal knowledge of the situation, when evaluating interpretive data is crucial. Conversely Guarte & Barrios (2006) note bias in research when a limited sample is used within research. Nevertheless due to the cautious selection of samples undertaken within this research Šimundić (2013) debate how positive sample representation is enabled through opposing views. McQueen& Knussen (2013) concur this further highlighting how a more detailed perspective is procured through qualitative research. Furthermore Newman, Jarvis & Holland (2012), Bell & Waters (2014) and Grix (2010) debate how through the use of ‘methodological triangulation’ within the interpretive paradigm, such as questionnaires, interviews and observations, a more in-depth study is enabled. Conversely Blaikie (2000) warns of the problems faced in triangulation with regards to validity, due to the inexperience of the novice researcher when combining data collection methods. However triangulation is considered by Savin-Baden & Major (2013) to give …show more content…
However Sieber & Tolich (2013) refer to the need to maintain continual consent, due to the emergent nature of the qualitative research. Furthermore as suggested by Iphofen (2011) by allowing perusal of the questions preceding the interview, anxieties by the interviewee were perceived to be lessened. Nevertheless, although such questions were found to give flow to the interview, the need for flexibility as discussed by Davies (2007) and McQueen& Knussen (2013) allowed the interviewee to guide and expand on any discussions where felt appropriate. Conversely due to such an emotive subject, variants in willingness to expand were also

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