Qualitative Interview

Superior Essays
Research methodology (continue)
Working alongside with Conversation analysis, the research selects interview as the second method to generate the data. This paper, for that selection, deals with the second key research instruments, interview. Specifically, it explains and proposes a plan for carrying out interview for the research. The section starts with discussing the advantages of interview instrument. What follows after is a brief overview and discussion around the issue of critical dimension of interview. This review helps to provide guidelines for the deployment of interview in this research. After that, the procedure of doing interview is introduced with regard to creating interview guide, question design and the proposed segments of
…show more content…
These are very insightful issues that have raised awareness for the consideration of carrying out qualitative interview for my research. The idea of missing critical dimension in qualitative interview is rooted from the standpoint of conceptualising interview as ‘active’ event with a constant meaning-making venture. This is to stress that the focus of any interview should not only be put on the interviewee per se. As a co-constructed setting, the identity, value and perception of both interviewer and interviewee interplay in the context and shape the interview. In addition to that, the interactional context, in which the interview occurs, is also often neglected. By interactional context, it includes the missing information on the participant’s selection categories, such as their position and relationship with the interviewer (Magnusson and Marecek, 2015c). Moreover, interactional context also covers the awareness of the researcher on the nature of qualitative interview with its own generic expectation. In other words, no matter how much the researcher wants to obtain information and understanding about the participants’ context, they need to be aware that the interview is an interactional and independent event on its own. As a whole, an interview is constructed and developed out of each turn the interviewer and interviewee utter. Therefore as a researcher, if I am too much into getting the information out of my participants, there is a risk for being doing the ‘what’ than the ‘how’. Put it differently, I am focusing primarily on “mining” the interviewee (Mann, 2010:06) and forgetting the importance of how to obtain information on the level of each turn and the process of doing an interview. This opens up a wider range of other

Related Documents

  • Great Essays

    In the following paper, I provide a comparative analysis of a casual conversation and a formal interview based on an approach to ethnography of communication as discussed by Saville-Troike (1997). After a brief review of related studies of these two communicative event types, I present the focus and the framework of the current study. Next, I present a comparative analysis of the two communicative events using the 11 components of communication compiled by Saville-Troike, followed by a summary and discussion of some of the findings of the analysis.…

    • 6257 Words
    • 26 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Hate Crime In Canada

    • 1281 Words
    • 5 Pages

    An in-depth interview allows the interviewee to explain their attitudes, feeling, and definitions of a particular situation they may be discussed. Also, the interviewee can explain the scenario in a method that has meaning to them. Additionally, when interviewed, people describe their social world in their own terms instead of the view point of questions the researcher creates. Interviews also are a social process of interaction that can provide more evidence through social cues. Moreover, the researcher gains deeper understanding of the group being studied by observing how they interact with the researcher. Also, a microphone can be used to record the interview. Recording the interview allows the research to listen to the interview again and analyze the participant responses more methodically. Being mindful of the participant’s body language can be crucial for further understanding. For example, the crossing of arms can indicate if a person is being defensive about a topic. The methodology of the interview would be semi-structured. A semi-structured interview has various advantages. One advantage is the ability to have a controlled method of data collection. A semi-structure interview has a series of identical question that is applied to all participant of a study. The data that results from identical questions is comparable and analyzable. The data is also easier to synthesize. Furthermore,…

    • 1281 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Why Join Gangs Sociology

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The interaction, however, needs to be done in a way that the interviewer does not become uneasy and uncomfortable to reveal their stories. It means that the researcher should understand the population well to determine the best behavior to adopt when performing the research. Similarly, the observation method also requires a good knowledge of the study population, to avoid misunderstanding and inconveniences, which may evoke conflict between the two. This is extremely important in the type of research, as field research and interviews are easy outlets for participants to feel like they are being treated as animals being studied (Creswell & Clark, 2007). If misunderstandings do take place, the accuracy of this study would decline, as participants may start to become dishonest. The research samples which are highly structure are coded without additional segmentation of the…

    • 798 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Through the interview process, there were various commonalities. Although each one had a different point of view due to their background and experiences. The interview subjects came from diverse backgrounds, due to their age, race, ethnicity, religion, and just general live experiences.…

    • 729 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Ethnographic Interview

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Illness, or a sickness that affects the body or the mind, is something that can greatly alter a person’s life. The majority illnesses people experience lasts a relatively short amount if time, and in that short time they can impact the way someone lives. However, only a number of people have experienced a chronic, or lifelong, illness. The apparent and less obvious ways an illness can change an individual’s life are numerous, reaching far beyond fitness and bodily health into other aspects of life. The affects of a chronic illness are not limited simply to physical health but extend much further into negatively influencing social interactions, mental well-being, and financial security.…

    • 1248 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    Semi-structured interviews will be conducted after focus groups as a development tool for my research. During focus groups, personal views may be restrained, as individuals are uncomfortable in expressing their own perspectives in front of a group (Finch & Lewis 2003, p185). Therefore, interviews will be a suitable method for my explanatory work by exploring young people’s personal views further. I will be interviewing 10 participants in total, which include of 5 students and 5 employed individuals. The interview will go for 45 to 60 minutes and take place on the Melbourne University campus or nearby location.…

    • 2088 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Superior Essays

    I will use the functionalist, social constructivism, and symbolic interactions theories to analyze the life history of the interviewee. I will also focus on her family values, religious belief, and interactions to analyze her history due to they all seemed to be extremely important to their…

    • 1290 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Decent Essays

    I have never conducted this type of interview before. So that was a challenge in its self for me, I can say I learned a lot about my interviewee which was very interesting to learn about someone’s life in such a detailed and methodological way. I felt this gave me the structure and opportunity to give the tools to understand why people behave and act in certain ways. As a social work major I also feel that this will give me the tools to have a better understanding of my clients and to not make any pre-judgement assumptions of why people behave in certain ways before I obtain a better understand of where they came from and how they were…

    • 478 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Improved Essays

    -An interview is a meeting between two people that has a definite purpose and is accepted by both individuals (Kadushin & Kadushin, 2013). An interview can involve both verbal and nonverbal communication between individuals where they share ideas or feelings (Kadushin & Kadushin, 2013). An interview has a goal or purpose for conducting verbal and nonverbal communication. The interview should have structure when discussing specific content or a clear direction for where the interview will lead (Kadushin & Kadushin, 2013). In an interview there are two main individuals responsible for the purpose and direction of the interview. The interviewer is the person that is leading the interview and explaining the purpose of the interview. The interviewee is the person who is being interviewed and they are responsible for helping the direction of the interview. In an interview, the purpose and direction need to be made clear by the individuals who are engaging in verbal or nonverbal communication. This helps to ensure the content in the interview is understood so that…

    • 579 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    This design will allow for the dissemination of information provided by the participants to lead the research in an unexpected direction and may lead to additional research at a later date. (Research to back this up) Survey based research method with a mixed-method approach to questioning will be used in this research. The quantitative questioning will involve the use of a Likert scale to enable easily quantifiable and statistical data. The qualitative questioning will request anecdotal information from open-ended questioning. A standardized structured of questioning will be used, but will allow for deviation to semi-structured for the qualitative questioning. It is important to recognize the act of human interactions and that personality and may have an effect on the type of interview completed. “Digressions by participants are expected and generally regarded as useful because they lead into topics that may prove to be more productive” (Yegidis, 2012. p.…

    • 1041 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As little is known about the research subject, the project is exploratory in nature and does not aim to establish “frequencies, means or other parameters” (Jansen, 2010) which are traditionally associated with quantitative studies. The responses of the participants are analysed without an established terms of reference to work by in terms of study design, with a summary of the diversity being created justified by the data provided by the participants experiences (Jansen, 2010). Thomas (2006) provides a guideline to taking an inductive approach in creating meaningful information through the use of themes and categories from rich raw data collected from the participants using open semi-structured interviews. Methodology Qualitative research is generally undertaken using one of four philosophical assumptions identified by Creswell (2012) and is usually determined by the closeness that a researcher identifies with the subject matter, and reinforced by the academic community in which the researcher associates…

    • 724 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Cognitive Inquiry is not a radically new technique for getting experience-based insights. Rather, it is a proven approach from a different discipline which can serve as a source of inspiration. This technique shares many of the characteristics of good qualitative interviews but it also offers some important differences which are worth further study.…

    • 367 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Great Essays

    The authors did not use a traditional qualitative methodology such as phenomenology, grounded theory, or ethnography. Instead they used “generic qualitative research” which does not use a guided methodological framework. The authors state four basic requirements necessary to conduct a well-done generic qualitative study. Due to complexity of the phenomenon studied, the researchers used Canale’s framework to develop interviews that incorporated explorative and interpretive properties. The principal researcher interviewed the participants in person for a period of 30 to 60 minutes. There is no evidence of reflexivity, which would have given the researcher the opportunity to self-reflect in a critical way and become aware of her own bias. There is no indication that the researchers contacted the participants after the interviews for any…

    • 1503 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    If the student applied the ethnographic interviewing techniques of listening and asking broad based questions, Mrs. McNeil may not have assumed a defensive or argumentative position with the student. During the interview the student asks questions that are to narrow and specific to Mrs. McNeil’s health status, residency and employment status, which upsets Mrs. McNeil. If broad based questions were asked, Mrs. McNeil could have had more control of the conversation and shared information that she felt conformable sharing with the student; the student could then ask follow up questions based on information shared by Mrs. McNeil instead of directing the conversation with specific questioning. Also, the student occasionally lacked the technique…

    • 216 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The participant in my interview was a 52 year-old male who was a truck driver and a sail maker by trade, but is currently unable to work due to his condition. He is fluent in English. Apart from the issue interviewed about, my participant has diabetes mellitus (type two) which he manages using insulin tablets, and myopia which he wears glasses for. The reason I decided to interview my participant was because I knew they have utilised the Australian healthcare a lot recently and had both positive and negative experiences. My interviewee has recently had 3 operations on his left wrist (and is left handed), one of which was an arthrodesis. His injury was sustained during his…

    • 912 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays