Patient Advocacy Case Study

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Patient advocacy does not require nurses to agree, promote, or tolerate any demographic on a personal ideology. What nursing and healthcare does require is professionalism which dictates “[c]ulturally competent nurses…..recognize the harmful effects of ignorance, hate, ethnocentrism, prejudice, and bias on the health of their patients”. (p. 113) Advocating for Lia would necessitate an examination of her social determinates and propagate care that would produce the best patient outcome even if it requires a variance from normal practice.
Introduction to 2011 Quad Council Competencies for Public Health Nurses
The Association of Community Health Nurse Educators (ACHNE), the Association of State and Territorial Directors of Nursing, the American
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The hospital executives would have been aware of the growing Hmong culture and the necessity to educate a staff group to be familiar with and capable of communicating in a positive way. This failure should be placed squarely on the shoulders of the executives in tier three for ignoring the need though it was known. The implementation should have been place and filtered down the tiers.
The healthcare team at MCMC lacked authentic leadership. The 8th domain of the quad council describes this competency as creating a vision, utilizing resources from all assets, and mentoring for professionalism. (Swider et al., 2013) The Fadiman, 1998 book illustrates this lack of professionalism quoting a statement that treating Hmong was synonymous with veterinary care. This demeaning mentality would only have served to subdue the value of the Hmong population.
Domain four, the cultural competency skills, was lacking in a diverse workforce, adapting care for cultural needs, and the culturally tailored healthcare. If this domain were met, the hostility of the Hmong to Americans, and the preference for shaman administration would be considered a
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The Hmong struggled to adapt to American culture partially because of their own cultural defiance to accommodation, but largely because of the prejudice that existed toward them. The leadership should take an authoritative stance and be the paradigm for cultural competency and initiate a shift. To meet the assessment competency the healthcare team should have assessed the living conditions, the cultural beliefs with respect to Hmong health beliefs, and their ideas concerning the preferential treatment the culture holds for afflicted members like Lia. A thorough assessment would have shed light that the family did not look at Lia as being sick in a way most consider an illness. Communication efforts to provide qualified interpreters to provide clear conveyance of the doctor’s wishes and the families to the doctors could have helped the contentious relationship between the two. The Lee’s skeptical trust in American health system presented a unique demand to intensify the benefit of positive communication skills. The Lee’s should have been included in each update and have their opinions valued in the decision making process. These communications could have improved the trust and promoted family adherence to decisions they participated in making. Finally, the MCMC being dedicated

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