Problems Caused By Political Parties

Improved Essays
Our government would be very different if we didn’t have Political Parties. Life would be a lot harder without them. Political Parties cause a few problems in the early days of the United States. Political Parties were created by strong men who knew what they wanted from their government. These men worked hard to develop Political Parties. They each felt strongly about their beliefs and wanted the rest of their country to feel that way too.
Political Parties developed in the united states for several reasons. They wanted to separate the groups for what they stood for. They also wanted to make it easier for voters to know what that Political candidate stood for. For example, imagine today is the day for voting for the new President of the United States. Instead of it saying that one candidate is a democrat or republican, they just gave the definition of a democrat and a republican. I personally, think that it would be a lot harder.
Political
…show more content…
For example, Hamilton criticized, and voiced his negative opinions about Thomas Jefferson and James Madison to make himself look better. This type of campaign is still done today. Opposing candidates send out letters, or tell the press bad and most of the time, untrue things about the other. Another example is gerrymandering. Gerrymandering was started to criticize the weaker Political party, it is usually done by the more powerful Political party. Political Parties have impacted the U.S. government in many ways, and our country would be different without them. Political Parties caused the death of Alexander Hamilton. If he lived through that duel then he might of been president, and our world might of been totally different. Political parties developed because Jefferson and Hamilton had such strong disagreements. If they never developed, then who knows how different our world would have

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    One other concern they had when establishing the executive branch was giving the president too much power. They feared the possibility of absolute power in the executive branch such as during the reign of King George the Third occurring again. That is why they put into place both limitations on the executive branch and an Electoral College system, which would make it so that a small elite group of the population would have the overall say in who becomes elected the next president. Therefore, if the Electoral College would be eliminated, the founders would probably not react too well. All the effort that they went to in order to make sure that the president would not be elected based off of just popular votes would have gone to waste.…

    • 1995 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    He instead tried to work out the problem we all have tried to solve in our minds. What makes a great president? This I believe was designed for us to take it a step further and to ask ourselves ‘Who of the four presidential candidates has the characteristics of a great president?’ I think this was an important topic because it causes us to think about specific characteristics instead of just the party system. It is quite easy to say Trump is the best candidate because he is Republican and that Clinton is the worst because she is a Democrat and vice versa, but I still people struggling to find specific attributes that they think would merit the presidency over another candidate. I was previously unaware of these specific attributes that make a good president.…

    • 1281 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Another unhelpful bump in the road came in the form of Thomas Jefferson, who often clashed with Hamilton and his ideals, leading to a rift between the people that would eventually result in the political parties we have today. Washington’s first order of business was taking care of the large amount of debt that had amassed once the Revolutionary war was finally over. Alexander Hamilton the secretary of the treasury, proposed a financial plan that insisted on raising taxes and establishing a national bank that would “collect all tax revenue...…

    • 702 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Yes, when a candidate is running for any position in government they run under a political party (democrat or republican), their ideals have to somewhat relate to the ideas that, that party represents. Partisan polarization has caused such a division in government that is it extremely hard for the government to agree, and get there job done. The division isn’t just between democrat and republican but also between republicans and the tea party (more conservative republicans) this makes it very hard to come into agreement in a political party. Especially because of the consequences that it brought to the government starting with the lack of compromise and bipartisanship that happens in the government, and the increase in gridlock with lack of policy activity. These consequences are great examples to why partisan polarization is bad for the government, because the government become useless with high levels of partisan…

    • 1358 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “Jefferson’s revolutionary viewpoints soon shaped the beginnings of a profound split in American politics. On one side… Alexander Hamilton… On the other side, centered on Thomas Jefferson…” (The First American Party System: Events, Issues, and Positions). Eventually, Jefferson and Hamilton argued over Hamilton’s financial plans, creating conflicts between Jeffersonians and Hamiltonians. The Jeffersonians were the ones who supported Jefferson and favored a powerful, yet not too powerful central government and a limit on presidency. The Hamiltonians were the people who agreed with Hamilton’s ideas and favored a powerful central government and a strong president.…

    • 870 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    State governments will make it too difficult to maintain the national government, they are bias, and Americans should have a firm union in this new nation. Overall, he was completely against state governments. He favored a strong federal government made of many wealthy members. Moreover, Hamilton held a loose interpretation of the Constitution. He even supported sometimes restrictions on speech and press under certain circumstances.…

    • 1205 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Wilson stated, “To stop playing the mimic play, to get out and translate the ideals of American politics into actions; so people can start being excited when they go to poll booths” (106). Wilson really cared about how much people cared about politics and he wanted them to be excited for politics not simply vote because it is their moral duty. Wilson had many ideas and plans that went into making his campaign speeches. He wanted to make the government more of a public interest instead of having everything behind closed doors, to fix that he planned to bring the government to the people and let them have a say in things. He wanted less government involved in businesses, so he decided to bring back competition and have an antitrust to separate the big businesses into smaller less powerful ones.…

    • 1770 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    (The Pittsburg Resolution, 1794)This was problematic to the Republicans since they had opposed British policies of taxation and quartering and now their new government was behaving similarly. Interestingly, these fears are still relevant to many Americans today, over 200 years later. Conflict between Republicans and Democrats often centers around how far the powers of the federal government…

    • 1278 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    As leaders in their parties, Hamilton and Jefferson only served to encourage the partisan divisions. The two members of Washington’s cabinet had different views on government. From as early as the Constitutional Convention, Hamilton was clearly a Federalist and Jefferson was clearly an Anti-Federalist. These philosophical differences between the two only served as a catalyst for their disputes during Washington’s presidency. Fearing that Hamilton’s economic plans would cause tyranny similar to the British rule, Jefferson created the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose Hamilton’s Federalist Party.…

    • 520 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Vote To Vote

    • 1074 Words
    • 5 Pages

    and social media, the people have the power to get data on almost anything at an instant. The Electoral College restricts American citizens entry to Presidential candidate’s media and attention, making their votes seem incoherent. It weakens the intelligence and morality of American voters by presuming that they do not have the ability to make an educated conclusion. In an honorable democracy, everyone’s vote should total equally, but the system that the United States utilizes to elect its president infringes this concept by making sure that some people’s votes are more just than others. If the Electoral College was eliminated, it would merely authorize citizens the right to vote for the president immediately and everyone’s vote would be fair.…

    • 1074 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays