Portpects Of Human Nature In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

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Everyone retains a specific “human” nature; however, it is left up to the individual how they choose to interpret various aspects of human nature in their everyday personalities. In the Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain incorporates various characters to capitalize on the flawed aspects of human nature. In the novel, it is evident that Twain is showing his disapproval towards the way humans behave. Each character: Pap, Grangerfords and Shepherdsons, and the King and Duke are able to embody one side of the human race.
How is it that one man is able to cause so much damage in someone’s life? Pap Finn is a prime example of the cruelty of human nature. His skin was so white, had no color, almost to point that he looked dead (14). From
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This diction is not giving the reader a solid foundation of Pap, doubting that he would be a good “father figure” in Huck’s life. As a parent, their sole job is to care for their child. However, Huck described an occurrence in which Pap always thought that borrowing things wasn't a bad idea, just as long as you get around to pay them back. The widow thinks "borrowing" is just another name for stealing, and no boy raised right would do it (49). From the text, the reader can clearly see that this man does no good in Huck’s life. Huck is raised by two other parental figures in his life, an old woman, Widow Douglas, who tries her best to teach Huck and make him become “civilized.” The moral character in the story, Jim, becomes the father figure for Huck to make up the connection that was lost with his own father. The fact that the only reason that the reader is able to meet Pap Finn is because he found out that his son has six …show more content…
With this, the reader is able to get a better understanding on how Twain satirized the

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