The Themes Of Social Class In The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn

1911 Words 8 Pages
Mark Twain, an ingenious writer, develops a book call The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. This book primarily focuses on an orphan boy call Huckleberry Finn and a runaway slave call Jim. They venture on the Mississippi River to meet and explore the world’s danger and social classes throughout the country. Moreover, social classes can create racism thereby, each social class needs to become more accepting of each other. Twain creates this intricate society by placing together various social classes during the 19th century. In general the literature focuses on how Huck, a fourteen year old boy becomes more acknowledging of others social classes throughout the book and discover the fact that life may convince of harsh social ideologies. It …show more content…
In a society lays a division of economical and structural differences between the people, leading to social classes. The social classes may vary with the vocations, stableness, and even personalities from time to time. Furthermore, Twain emphasizes slavery by utilizing their spiritual beliefs; “Jim was most ruined, for a servant because he got so stuck up on account of having seen the devil and been rode by witches.” (19) Moreover, Twain utilizes classification to identify Jim, the slave, the most prevalent social class during the Antebellum Period due to the involuntary movement of slaves from Africa. He conveys the reader to identify slaves as a believer of the supernatural. Within the subliminal text, he underlines the fact, that slaves construct their basis throughout with religious issues. Additionally, Twain advances the plot in the story and also creates the new social tension between the whites represented by Huck and the slaves represented by Jim. However, social classes can also be identified throughout their houses: “It was a double house and the big open place betwist them was roofed and floored, and sometimes the table was set there in the middle of the day, and it as cool ,comfortable place.” (Twain 124) The Shepherdsons’ house, described in the evidence, can classify as an intermediate class family, meaning they could self sustain themselves. The difference between social classes can be determined by the houses …show more content…
"It had a picture of a runaway nigger, with a bundle on a stick, over his shoulder, and '$200 reward ' under it." (Twain 149 ) Twain develops a pair of characters called the Duke and the King. Twain utilizes these characters as a gateway to demonstrate the racial tensions between the acclaimed to be higher white versus a runaway slave especially throughout the last part of the book. Furthermore, the duke He takes ownership of his property like saying “ our nigger” and “ goodness knows we had trouble enough for [Jim].” (Twain 225) The duke exemplifies as person utilizing a person to his/ her advantage and he uses Jim as he literally owns him. Slavery dominates the country during this time and the development of social classes also seems more prevalent than usual. The lowest class, slavery, receives little to no freedom, no education, and works hard labor on the plantations. The other social classes consist of basically all whites. The low/middle develops stable, low paying jobs, a small home, and basic freedom. The highest class manages to obtain higher paying jobs, better lifestyles, and maybe own slaves on their plantation. The higher whites would treat the slaves horribly by whipping them, letting them starve partially to die, and giving them no time to rest. Miss Watson, the widow’s sister, may perceive as a somewhat wealthy woman having a “big nigger, named Jim” or slave ( Twain 18).The enforcement of widow

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