Guided Discovery Approach Case Study Essay

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Introduction

This case study report is to outline the process of planning an activity in science understanding physical science for a 5 year old child with the expectation of learning the concept of motion, inertia, force, velocity, acceleration and gravity by using balls, blocks and tubes. The report will also outline the pedagogy approach adopted by educators to ascertain that the child will engage in a physical science activity, which will improve the child’s skills of problem solving, critical thinking and reasoning in accordance to the Australian Curriculum and The Early Years Learning Framework for Australia expectation. Activity Design

(Appendix 1, pp. 7-12)

Context

In this case study, the child is a 5 year old girl in a
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The educator has adopted a guided discovery, interactive and inquiry learning approaches. Firstly Campbell, Jobling and Howitt (2015, p. 72) refer to guided discovery approach that the educator creates a situation where the preconceive knowledge will help with understanding and extend the learning. The guided discovery approach is shown below (Appendix 1, p.9) lesson beginning and also shown below (Appendix 2, p. 13). Both appendixes show the child’s prior knowledge in the bowling experience. Secondly, the interactive approach, where the educator allowed the child to ask questions of their own, and in turn allows the educator to support the child’s investigation with prompting questions to encourage critical thinking and reasoning (Campbell, Jobling and Howitt, 2015, p. 72). The interactive approach is shown below in (Appendix 2, p. 13) when the educator said “When the ball got stuck it’s because there was not enough force to propel it forward, do you know what this motion is called?” and this approach is shown throughout (appendix 2, pp. 12-17). Thirdly, the educator adopted the learning approach, which Campbell, Jobling and Howitt (2015, p. 73) state that the learning approach consist of five namely engagement, exploration, explanation, elaboration and evaluation. The educator used the engagement phase to find out how much the child knows, as indicated …show more content…
The equipment used was age appropriate and sufficient amount to encourage investigation. In future if this activity is used, a stopwatch could be added to facilitate the child’s data collecting and learning. Children learn science from a very young age as they are very inquisitive always asking question about how thing work in the world. Children accumulate learning through exploring and interaction. They need time to explore the activity and guidance from educators who take the right approach to

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