Organized Labor Laws In 1900

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In the mid 1900 there was a lot going on with organized labor in the country. Two wars and a changing economy made for new working conditions and new things to consider when it came to the workplace. After World War one there was a switch from agricultural to industrialized work and with industrialized work came dangerous working conditions. This fueled a lot of workers to want to turn to organized labor so that they felt they had a voice. Alone one worker was essentially powerless against the owners, or employer. Unionized the workers were strong as ever. There were a lot of bills passed in the early 1900 some to support organized labor, some not in support of organized labor, but in the mid 1900 there were some essential acts that balanced …show more content…
The Norris LaGuardia Act of 1932, also known as the anti-injunction act, was also in powerful piece of legislation that was passed in the 1930s. The Norris LaGuardia Act picked up where the Clayton Act of 1914 stopped, curtailing the use of injunctions more effectively. The purpose of this act was to protect workers against anti-labor injunctions. At the turn of the century the government and law was totally in favor of the employers and business owners. Whenever workers would try to organize the courts would order “injunctions”, and these injunctions wouldn’t allow the workers to strike or picket. As effective as the Norris LaGuardia Act was it was still a federal law and employers would still seek injunctions in It also forbade Yellow Dog contracts, which are contracts between an employee and an employer in which the employee agrees, as a condition of the contract, not to join a …show more content…
In 1946 after World War II ends millions of unionized workers go on strike across the country. This had a negative effect on the economy and that angered a lot of people. So they pass the labor management Relations Act in 1947. Congress passed this act over Harry Truman’s veto, which requires 2/3 of Congress to do. This also help reverse and games made from the Wagner Act of 1935. Some of the key aspects of the Taft-Hartley Act are that day made closed shops illegal; and also established right-to-work laws which, which means non-union members at work in unionized jobs. It also allowed the President to appoint a panel to investigate labor disputes. The Act also mandated in 80 days cooling off period for strikes, making it mandatory for unions to give the employer and 80 day notice before going on strike in an attempt to prevent the strike from happening. The last part may seem irrelevant in today’s workplace but union leaders had to pledge that they were not communist, which was a big deal right after World War

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