Haymarket Square Strike Essay

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Introduction The Haymarket Square Riot took place on May 4, 1886 in Chicago Illinois. In the United States, the labor unions have an extensive and compelling history increasingly developing the world’s largest economy in history, the union movement influence in many significant ways to this unparalleled expansion. The unions have delivered numbers of achievements to American workers. Some achievements include to a safe and intolerant work environment, collective bargaining power, the right hour workday, no child labor, wage standards, political guidance and much more. Important changes today are taken for granted. The distinctive work environment involvement took time and progress over the life of the American Republic. However, in some …show more content…
The role of management and the government were in mediation labor. In the early 1880s Pullman’s factories flourished, Pullman had always wanted to build a town or a community to house his workers. On the outskirts of Chicago, the Pullman community was created. The town of Pullman was around the factory. There was houses build for all the workers, the town had banks, a hotel, and a church they were all owned by Pullman’s company. Pullman built a town that was different form urban communities that he seen as a great problem in America’s growing industrialized society. Establishments like dance halls, saloons were not permitted in the city limits of Pullman. The company had spies watching workers during their days off the job (McNamara, 2015). The panic of 1893, it was a financial depression that distressed the American economy. Pullman cut wages by one third, but he did not lower the rents on the company housing. The American Railway Union (ARU) took action with 150,000 members called for a strike at the Pullman Palace Car Company. Pullman was furious by the strike, Pullman closed the plant, intent on waiting out the workers. The members of the ARU called for the national membership to take over. The union voted to refuse to work on any train in the country that had a Pullman car, this put the passenger rail service came to …show more content…
Attorney General, Richard Olney was determined to crush the strike. The strike ended on July 2, 1894 was ordered by the federal government. Tactics employers used prior to passage of the NLRA Wagner Act in 1935. Were discharge or refusal to hire for union activity, blacklisting, company spies, to here employee representation plans, and NLRA determined the yellow dog contracts to be unfair labor practices. The tactics that would be lawful today would be the yellow dog contracts, the contract would be an agreement between employer, and the employee agrees as a condition if employed, not to be member of a labor union. Another tactic that can be used now in a company that has a union would be employee representation plan for union workers. The events of history the forming of labor organizations and the endorsement of laws bring the labor relations t where they are today. The NLRA of 1935 was the important legislative support to the union. The Wagner Act gave private sector employees the right to organize unions and bargain accordingly. There are 3 stage of the evolution of labor, 1869 to World War I, World War II to World War II to the present (Holly et al.,

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