Motivational Interviewing

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We chose motivational interviewing. Motivational Interviewing is an approach that works on promoting and engaging essential motivation within the client in order to change behavior.[citation needed] MI is a goal-oriented, client-centered counseling style for invoking behavior change by helping clients to explore and resolve ambivalence. In comparison with non-directive counseling, it's more focused and goal-directed. It goes away from traditional client-centered therapy through this use of direction, in which therapists attempt to influence clients to consider making changes, rather than non-directively explore themselves.[1] The study and resolution of ambivalence is a central purpose, and the counselor is intentionally directive in pursuing this goal.[2]
MI recognizes and acknowledges that clients who need to make changes in their lives approach counseling at many different levels of readiness to change their behavior.[3] While in
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Alternately, or in addition, therapists may help clients envision a better future, and become increasingly motivated to achieve it.[7] The approach helps clients think differently about their behavior and ultimately to consider what might be gained through change.[8] Motivational interviewing targets the present, and entails working with a client to access motivation to change a particular behavior that is not consistent with a client's personal value or goal.[9]Warmth, genuine empathy, and acceptance are necessary to cultivate therapeutic gain (Rogers, 1961) within motivational interviewing. A central concept is that ambivalence about decisions is resolved by conscious and unconscious weighing of pros and cons of change vs. not changing (Ajzen,

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