Motivation Of Aaron Burrr

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Aaron Burr was native born to New Jersey and was dealt a rough childhood of sickness and family death, which included his parents in his first few years of life. He would grow up in under the brutal hands of his uncle that provided no support. Aaron Burr quickly took charge of his own destiny and at the age of eleven applied for admission to Princeton, but would not be accepted into the school until the age of thirteen. His determination and drive to reach his personal goals was reflected in studies in law and his ambition to volunteer for military service after the Battle of Lexington. Aaron Burr’s was made captain on the General Montgomery’s headquarters staff and would be exposed to his first combat engagement in the Battle of Quebec in …show more content…
He was assigned to aide-de-camp under General Israel Putnam. Now promoted to a Major he was temporarily assigned to General McDougal, but as a result of the evacuation of New York in 1776 he returned to General Putnam’s command. Aaron Burr received a command of his own regiment as a Lieutenant Colonel over the famed “Malcolm’s Regiment” and demonstrated his ability to successfully lead his men during battle and was credited in repulsing nearly 2500 Tories who attempted to raid New York. He was also present at Valley Forge and Battle of Monmouth, shortly thereafter his health began to decline. He returned to duty under the command of General McDougal where he lead surprise attacks against British lines along the New York border. He was unable to return to full health and resigned in 1779 from the Army, but continued to be an influence until the war’s …show more content…
Burr also studied and read up on his history related to wars, battles, and sieges, which lessons learned would be used in his future military career. In 1774, the talks of colonial unrest over taxation and the rights of the colonist pushed Burr to study Constitutional law that included the rights of the people and the crown. His studies and future in practicing law was interrupted by the reports of Colonial unrest in Boston and the recently convened Continental Congress. Upon learning of the bloodshed of his fellow colonist at the Battle of Lexington and Concord, Burr made a pact with his friend Matthias Ogden to volunteer for the Continental Army in New England. In August of 1775, both Burr and his friend arrived in Cambridge, Massachusetts and learned that Benedict Arnold was urging for an invasion into Canada to attack Quebec in the attempt to gain the Continental Army’s first victories of the war. Arnold Benedict’s request was approved by the Continental Congress and Burr eagerly joined the ranks of the

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