French Indian War Dbq Analysis

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After the French Indian War broke out in 1756, American colonists gradually developed an American identity. They attempted to separate from the tyranny of the British Empire, because they didn’t regard themselves as British anymore. Even if the colonists were initially reluctant to challenge British authority, they became united under a common cause; the discontent of the virtual representation, and the frequent turmoil in Boston and the Continental Congress are all motivation for independence and unity. In the first place, Americans were dissatisfied with the lack of rights compared to Englishmen and the extra tax they were forced to pay. Colonies occupied a large portion of western territory as a result of the victory in the French and …show more content…
Consequently, colonists were definitely opposed to paying tax. Furthermore, based on the theory of virtual representation, everyone lived under the crown was nomial represented in the British Parliament in some way, though colonies had no representative in the British Parliament at all. In reality, when colonists complained that they were unrepresented in Parliament, so they should not be taxed, colonists won almost no support in Britain. As stated by Edmund Burke after the Stamp Act Crisis, America should not be governed towards the way of governing English towns (Doc B). His intention was calling for unity and an American identity. The Stamp Act was the first act that affected all colonists. Although British Parliament repealed the Stamp Act in 1766 based on the increasing complaints from recalcitrant colonists, it immediately issued a Declaratory Act which asserted the absolute authority of Parliament to make laws in colonies. Accordingly, the unresolved problems of the relationship between the British …show more content…
In particular, the Declaration for the Causes of Taking up Arms, proclaimed by the Second Continental Congress in 1775, expressed that the purpose of raising arms was not to threaten British Empire or establish independent states; it was only vital and just for the defiance of colonies’ possible enemies (Doc E). The declaration implied to the British that the colonies had tried to avoid the bloody and violent war up until that point. What is more, based on the Contributors of Donations for the Relief of Boston, colonies from north to south all contributed to aid Boston in 1774 and 1775 (Doc F). In other words, during the eve of the revolution, colonies banded together against the common enemy of Britain, which strengthened their solidarity and gave them an identity. At the same time, Americans were still not desperate of obtaining liberty through negotiation with the British. Thereupon, they sent Olive Branch Petition, which expressed their loyalty to the king and to British Parliament as a last attempt. However, King George III was so suspicious with the colonists that he officially declared that American colonies were in rebellion. Eventually, in split of the last loyalty of the colonists for the Britain, George III’s suspicions pushed the colonists on the path of independence of which there was no way going

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