Mohandas Gandhi, Nelson Mandela And Martin Luther King Jr.

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Despite all that the United States has to offer its citizens and even its guests, there are numerous people within the country who are not happy with the government. They claim that, despite the United States’ stature in the international community and the governments repeated actions to help other nations, we are not as strong or as resourceful when it comes to fixing our own problems. Many Americans would argue that, far too often in our nation’s history, we have failed to recognize and fix the numerous problems within our own nation. With the conversation of police brutality and inequality taking center stage yet again in the United States, we find ourselves at a very opportune time to challenge the systems that we feel are hurting our nation …show more content…
We must do everything in our power to make sure that the people we elect are truly for the people. Choosing to accept the current realities of governmental power is only giving those realities even more power. It is vital for Americans to understand that the power structures that are in place are not too great to change and that it would be irresponsible for us to not attempt to change “the systems.” Mohandas Gandhi, Nelson Mandela and Martin Luther King Jr. are all great examples of how activism can actually change a system(s). Each of them had to fight systems in order to change whatever power structures that had forced injustices to be normality. Gandhi led India to gaining its independence from British Colonial rule. His activism opened numerous doors for his people and ultimately gave his people the power to govern themselves freely. Gandhi, despite the difficulties of what he was trying to accomplish was able to successfully break down the systems in place peacefully. Mandela became South Africa’s first black president after many years of fighting the oppressive apartheid system that was in place. Mandela, despite being ridiculed and even jailed, did not compromise to the systems in place. King, an African American civil rights activist, peacefully and powerfully led the way to open more doors for African …show more content…
He says that if we fail to actually back up what we say then our words will hold no weight. He points out that if the United States doesn’t back up what it says, then what we say will become like a broken glass. Once people see it is broken, they will keep breaking it. In his article he practically calls Americans complacent when he says “Americans have lived in a relatively orderly world for so long that we have become somewhat complacent about maintaining it.” (Stephens) This yet again another example of why we should challenge systems. If we are to be the policemen of the world then we have to make sure that we fix our problems here at home. If we simply choose to live within the system then we are endangering our reputation in the international community. If our government does not respect the people it is governing, then chances are that they will not make decisions that are in the interest of the people. Challenging systems is another way of making sure that our voices are heard not just by our government but all around the world. If it wasn’t for the civil rights marches taking a center stage around the world because of how some police officers treated blacks then things may have never changed. Even the most important decisions in the world can be influenced by American citizens. Why

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