Migrant Culture Essay

1619 Words 7 Pages
The notion of ‘Migrant culture’ is embedded in New Zealand’s society, and perhaps its culture as a whole. As a multicultural nation, people from all over the world have migrated to settle in the land of the long white cloud, Aotearoa. The high level of cultural diversity within such a small country, created a strong migrant culture, particularly when it comes to communication amongst different ethnicities and cultures. In contemporary society, communicating with family back home, or perhaps, simply maintaining an aspect of one’s identity has been vastly assisted and supported through Mediatisation. This mentioned aspect of cultural identity could range from learning a language to consuming or merely just purchasing “ethnic” food that is relevant …show more content…
These relevant factors that form an individual’s migrant culture differ to the extent where it is difficult to limit them to a list. Overall, a migrant’s cultural identity can be referred to as simply intercultural, which refers to a spectrum and a mix of cultural roots and backgrounds. However, there are three overarching concepts of migrant cultural identity that can cover most cases. These are origin-oriented, ethnic-oriented and world-oriented (Hepp et. al 177). Although each concept captures distinguished levels of migrant culture, they do overlap in the long run . This overlap has been caused by …show more content…
It is an advancement that has embedded itself into our daily routines. It assists individuals who identify with a migrant culture, to understand their type of culture. Whether they identify as origin-oriented (those who identify with a country of origin), ethno-oriented (those who identify with a sense of duality in their culture) or world-oriented (those who identify with the world as their home) (Hepp et. al 177). In order for the concept of migrant culture to exist and for an individual to identify with the form of culture they have, there must be a form of link that will connect migrants to their culture of origin (Hepp et. al 173). Mediatization allowed this connection, or rather contact to occur through the technological resources that are available at an individual’s disposal (Hepp et. al 173). These technological resources enable and support the process of transferring and living through facets of a migrant’s culture while being abroad (Cordeiro 105). As mentioned earlier, there are different concepts of migrant cultural identity. All of them are enabled through mediatization. These concepts are somewhat triggered by mediatization, since it allows yet limits the modes of communication

Related Documents