Love In William Shakespeare's Sonnet 130

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Love is like a tunnel your traveling through, its either your going to make it to the other side or not make it at all. As you travel through the tunnel, your going to have some changes and challenges come your way. Your going to have to battle with a lot of emotions in the stage of love. The original name to this poem is “Sonnet 130” I just wanted to make the title more interesting. From William Shakespeare, “the author of the poem” view he compares his woman to many spectacular things. This creates the effect of an expanding and developing argument, which does after all relying on some type of metaphor to let the reader know where’s he coming from. The speaker opens the poem by stating his remarkable beloved’s eyes: ‘nothing like the sun’. …show more content…
Perfume was really expensive and a worthy object back in the day, but it can be seen as a pleasant smell in nature too. The mistress breath does not only smell worse than perfume, it even “reeks.” This strong word intensifies the statement that nobody comes close to her and establishes a relationship with her. I busted out laughing in class when i read that. The speaker announces that he loves her, independently. In line thirteen you find the height of his comparison in nature and meaning: the “heaven.” His love is higher than anything he was comparing her with previously. For the speaker she is much worth and he loves her more than anybody who believed he wasn't in line fourteen. This last line is an attack on men who think a woman is only an object to look on, not a person to look into. The value of a woman is dependent on the thing you compare her with. Even if the mistress does not accord with the typical comparisons men used in the speaker’s times, she still can be beautiful in his eyes. Either because of her pretty visual nature, which he just needs to compare with different precious things, and you cannot see immediately but have to find …show more content…
Women were supposed to delight men with a lovely face and body. But to fall in love with a woman because she was smart or intellectual was totally untypical. You cannot say for sure that the author is at the same time the speaker of this sonnet, but probably William Shakespeare advanced the view he lets his speaker have. He wanted other men living in his times to rethink their opinion about women. After reading “Sonnet 18” and “Sonnet 130” from William Shakespeare’s book “Shakespeare’s Sonnets”, it seems contradictorily that he wrote two sonnets as different as can be. In one sonnet the only reason the speaker loves his woman is because she looks beautiful, and in the other the speaker loves her although she does not look handsome in the eyes of most men. William Shakespeare’s purpose was to make those typical love poems in the 16th century, when he probably wrote his sonnets, look superficially. After reading this sonnet the reader finds other love poems superficial and thinks that it is shocking how women were reduced on their appearance. Through “Sonnet 130” William Shakespeare wants to show that real love is deeper and goes beyond

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