Maybelline Celebrity Holiday Advertisement Analysis

Great Essays
An Analysis of Maybelline’s Celebrity Holiday Advertisement
Cosmetics seem to be a rite of passage for girls transitioning to teenagers. They are inspired by the beautifully enhanced models in magazines and the filtered celebrities they follow on social media. But while the famous are beautiful perfect, the average person isn’t. From Natalie Portman to Tyra Banks, cosmetics companies employ fresh, famous faces to promote and advertise their product. They prey on the innocence and the income of the young through these celebrities who have an influence over consumers and what they buy. Advertisers take advantage of this and turn around to make a profit off of young consumers money. Ulta, the popular beauty store which houses hundreds of cosmetic
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The “Jetsetter” ad utilizes cultural norms, beliefs, and the rhetorical strategy to sell their product effectively. Women are bombarded with images that show them unrealistic expectations for themselves. “These images paint a picture of the ideal family, the perfect home. What a beautiful woman is,” says marketing executive Jay Chiat (p. 225). Photoshopped models, airbrushed actresses and filtered Instagram pictures lead women to look at themselves in the mirror and see nothing like the women in magazines or online. Advertisers use pathos to evoke the emotion in their audience. In this case they are taking an ordinary woman and comparing her to a supermodel. Photoshopping and digitally enhancing expert Ashley Brown (2015) says, “Advertising works by seeming to ‘‘invite us ‘freely’ to create ourselves in accordance with the way in which they have already created us’’(p.689). But while it may hurt an individual’s self-esteem, it is a booster for cosmetics and beauty sales everywhere. In recent years, the Advertising Standards Authority (ASA), has cracked down on brands like Maybelline, CoverGirl, and L’Oréal to decrease some of these falsified images for the benefit for profit. “The NAD, recently banned two L’Oréal celebrity advertisements, demonstrating how a consumer is likely to be misled by the false representations of Photoshop” (Brown, 2015, p. 98). …show more content…
Maybelline’s moto alone, “Maybe she’s born with it. Maybe it’s Maybelline” indicates how models may be born with beauty, but the consumer can be like the model and buy Maybelline. Celebrities can endorse a certain product, but that doesn’t mean they are experts on the product. Hadid symbolizes what women want to be everywhere, young, beautiful, confident and successful. Associate professor of English, Barbara J. Blakely (2011) comments on advertising rhetoric. “There is an important presence of ‘‘visible rhetoric’’ that is making use of popularly accepted and celebrated values to sell products (p. 10). These ideals appeal to the masses because it is tenaciously unrelenting in its message. This leads many consumers to believe that Hadid would use this affordable brand found almost anywhere. It is doubtful that Hadid would actually use these products but she puts in a good effort to convince the audience of the opposite. In bold letters under her new product is “24 New Gigi Hadid Products”. Not Maybelline, but Gigi Hadid as if her name alone gives it credibility. Consumer’s trust celebrities who are perceived experts in their field. This same principle is seen on the palette itself, where Maybelline is in much smaller and less flashy typography. As if the brand does not want its customers to know they are buying an inexpensive product. Because the reality is that Hadid would never

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