Mary Seacole Thesis

Improved Essays
Thesis: Mary Seacole has an enormous amount of impact on the advancement of public health by rising above oppression, discrimination and prejudices faced during her lifetime because of the color of her skin and her sexuality, and thus opening the door for ethnic minorities in nursing (spartacus-educational.com, 2003).
II. Mary Seacole
A. Early years and Education – Mary Grant Seacole was born in 1805, in Kingston, Jamaica, to a local and a Scottish naval officer, and was affectionately known to many as, “The Angel of Mercy -the Jamaican nurse who plays a very vital role during the Crimean War.” Her mother taught her how to use herbal and folk medicine to care for others who needed her help, as her mother kept a boarding house for injured
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Why she was compelled to act (circumstances that called for action, i.e.: a certain disease, unsanitary conditions contributing to a major outbreak, etc.) – Mary practice involve using herbal medicines and other remedies such as acetate and mercury chloride to heal and cure the ailments of the diseased. She was also the prevailing nurse on call during the outbreak of yellow fever in Jamaica, and it was because of this why her fame as a Heroine grew worldwide; at times she would carry out operations on people suffering from knife and gunshot wounds. She was also the first to used cinnamon’s essential oil which possess antimicrobial properties to alleviate the symptoms of cholera which was affiliated from consuming dirty water or contaminated food (ncbi.nlm.nih.gov, …show more content…
The local up to global impacts achieved – By the late 1990s Mary was celebrated as a nursing pioneer and the first nurse practitioner. She also became an advocate for the needs of war widows and orphans, a masseuse to the Princess of Wales. Oftentimes, Mary had to work profusely under severe pressure in overcoming prejudice inflicted by other, but by incorporating her talents, skills and energy, she finally earned her place as one of the most influential and famous nurses within the era of the past. Since Mary’s methods were unorthodox, she exceeded her goal as a healer, and thus stands prominent as an inspiration to all nurses today (victorianweb.org,

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