Martin Luther's Argument Of Freedom Of A Christian

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In Luther’s second argument he states that no amount of good deeds can produce freedom to soul, only those who have faith in the holy word of God can free their soul. To support the argument that Martin Luther makes we will look closely at one of Martin Luther’s treaties The Freedom of a Christian. This treatise was supposed to be a sign of good faith to show the Pope that there were no hard feelings but “in the eyes of many it became a classic document of liberation” (Marty 63). In his treatise Martin Luther denounces the argument made by Erasmus that good works could lead to salvation or righteousness. He states in this treatise that “in every person there are two natures-one that is of the spirit and one that is of the body” (Lull Russell …show more content…
In the very first sentence I believe that Martin Luther is speaking directly to priest of the Catholic Chruch who sell their congregation indulgences. I say this because these priests preached for indulgences, which according to Luther goes against the very word of God. In his treatise he is making the priest as well as the people aware that just because you spread the word of God does not mean you are saved, yes this is a good works, but these good works will not bring you righteousness. Only the believers in the word of God can be saved, those who have faith “For faith alone is the saving and efficacious use of the word of God” (Lull Russell 405). “To preach Christ means to feed the soul, make it righteous, set it free, and save it, provided the preaching is believed” (Lull Russell 405). Here Luther says that no robe can save their soul, just attending church will not bring you righteousness, not amount of prayer can save you from damnation that only those who have faith in the word of God can be saved. Although these priests, and laity may preach the word of God to others they must not only speak of the gospel to be saved but they must believe it. He states that no amount of praying, sacred duties, or fasting could lead to Christian righteousness or freedom as these are good works that any hypocrite could perform (Lull Russell 405). Anyone can pray to God or fast but only faith in the word of God will grant the sinner true freedom and righteousness, no good works. This type of obedience Martin Luther speaks of is costly as “it cost a man his life, and it is grace because it gives a man the only true life” (Coles 55). It is only this type of obedience, following of God, discipleship that Luther speaks of in his treatise that will allow the sinner to receive the cloak righteous from God. Dietrich Bonhoeffer thoughts are closely related

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