Examples Of Protestant Reformation In Hamlet

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Hamlet by William Shakespeare, in the Elizabethan Era, is a ple may that is expressed with many themes. Hamlet, the main character, battles with tragic the death of his father and the marriage of his mother and uncle. Hamlet is then approached by a ghost that closely resembles his father and reveals the murder of the late king. Hamlet then goes on a quest for revenge, hesitating at every turn and pretending to have gone mad. He spends time rejecting the love of Ophelia until her untimely death. At that time he then goes to duel her brother, of whom he is jealous, in a fencing match. There the intentions of the characters are revealed in the death of Laertes, Gertrude, Hamlet, and Claudius. Throughout the play religion takes a big part in the …show more content…
The Protestant Reformation was a religious revolution lead by Martin Luther and John Calvin. The Roman Catholic Church of the medieval world was complex and had its hand in the politics, especially the papacy, of Western Europe. The Churches increasing power and wealth along with their political influence corrupted the church’s spirituality. The chief of the liberal Catholic Reform attacked favored superstitions, which revealed the concerns of the within the church. Martin Luther claimed that his reform was different because it focused on the church’s doctrine of redemption and grace, the underlying cause of the problems. Luther wrote his Ninety-Five Theses in which he attacked the indulgence system and stated that the pope had no right to control purgatory. The church would sell indulgences to penitents for a promise of forgiving sins. Luther made it known that faith alone would be our salvation and not doing good work. His word spread throughout Europe, making its way to the pope and the council of the Holy Roman Empire’s attention. When Luther refused to recant his writings, he was excommunicated. The church established the Council of Trent who affirmed the teachings of the Catholic Church. These events caused violence and pitted families against each other, each religion thinking they were correct. Those who followed with Luther’s reform found another meaning for things such as the Catholic …show more content…
Even under the same government the people of Europe had divided beliefs. This follows the theme of religion that is seen in Hamlet. In the play they had their own belief and traditions in the castle of Elsinore in Denmark. When the new king, Claudius, was crowned and Hamlet had decided to stay at Elsinore, Claudius had taken to the traditions of drinking and firing of cannons. A tradition of which Hamlet had not cared for; the way Martin Luther did not care for the teaching of the Catholic Church. They both felt as if other things were more appropriate. The people of Europe followed the teaching of the Catholic Church and the bible. They chose their actions and feelings based on those beliefs. They took to buying indulgences in the belief that they would spend less time in purgatory. Hamlet also shared that belief of purgatory. The ghost reveals his

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