Communist Manifesto Summary

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A Review of the Manifesto of the Communist Party Before I write the review of the actual text of the manifesto, there is a few thoughts, questions, and ramblings that I would like to use as a preface to the actual review. First, there seems to be a repulsion in some western, and strongly capitalistic, societies to actually engage in the task of understanding thought that is foreign or different from the prevalent thinking. This seems to be the case when speaking about Marxist and/or Communist/Socialist style political and philosophical theory. Right from the name of the pamphlet, The Communist Manifesto, there is an inclination that it should be avoided, or that it is in someway evil because of the word “Manifesto”. It would be very interesting …show more content…
This struggle culminates in the need for the “working” class to unite together. From the beginning of the text, it is made clear that the theory of “communism” has already been labeled as a threat and something evil. All of this is caused by people not understanding the theories of communism, and a call to communists to openly explain the correct views to people. In the first section, there is great emphasis place on the Marxist understand of how a history of materialistic desire has brought about the current situation in society. This particular area of the text should be studies closely and a comparison could be made to ideas circulating in modern times. As an example, think about all working class people who are constantly upset about their social situation. They complain, they blame the current government, they say they want change. However, when change could happen they force themselves to choose government leadership from a very narrow group of candidates that derive their existence from the same corporations that are trying to keep the working class people in their place. Very simplistic example but, fitting for the understanding of the …show more content…
This section should really be read closely. After all, this entire pamphlet is made by the Communist party, who better than them to show the contrast between other similar ideas that are labeled under the penumbra of communism, and what they actual think communism is. Perhaps the most intriguing part is found at the end where it is made clear that the communst party want to help the social democrat workers. Does this not seem odd considering that most people contrast communism with democracy? This is perhaps the most telling part of the pamphlet for me, and the part that I think need to be explained better to the common people. That is, communism is an economic system just like capitalism. You should be extremely careful in comparing and labeling political inclinations e.g., Democracy, Monarchy, Dictatorship, etc, with types of economic systems. This seems kind of strange because communism is also a type of political system. But that doesn 't mean you can 't have democracy whose economic model is based on the communist market model. Is it not the case that there exists in the world today a country viz., China, that is trying to have a communists government with a capitalist economic

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