The Founding Fathers: A Minorities In Action Analysis

Improved Essays
James Madison’s main argument is that factions are a problem in a well governed society, and that that a good republic should prevent the tyranny of the majority, and protect the rights of the minorities. The constitution of The United States, and The Federalist Papers both outline how a proper republic should be established, with strategies to limit the impact of factions, and create majority and minority rights. Michael Parenti wrote “The Constitution as an Elitist Document”, in which he argues against some of the points made in the Constitution and in the Federalist Papers. John Roche writes “The Founding Fathers: A Reform Caucus in Action”, he argues overwhelmingly in favor of Madison.
In Federalist Paper #10, Madison argues that the most important factor in the union is to control factions. A faction is a community of people that have a common passion or interest. He says …”none deserves more accurately developed than its tendency to break and control the violence of factions.” (Madison 1788). Madison believed that factions ruined the progress of a well ordered republic. Since members of the U.S. government are also in various factions, great conflict of interest is caused. Madison knows this, “The instability, injustice, and confusion introduced into the public
…show more content…
The way to keep each department powerful …”consists in giving to those who administer each department the necessary motives to resist encroachment of the others.” (Madison 1788). Another prominent point that Madison makes is, if the majority powers of the common people are submitted to the government, the power must be secured doubly. Also, he says “In a free government the security for civil rights must be the same as that for religious rights.” (Madison 1788). Meaning, in American society the government should protect the rights of political and religious expression of all

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    A simple fact of nature for humans is their desire to compete and win, the true can be said for minority and majority groups. James Madison foresaw this problem when writing Federalist 10. He discusses the problems with factions and their threat they posed to the new government, as well as the naturally ambitious nature of humans and how that can be used to control power. Lastly, Madison claims that pluralism and the ambition of people are the solution to factions. The Madisonian majority is the idea of small factions, groups of either minority or majority looking to bend public interests in their favor.…

    • 987 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It is human nature to naturally be evil and we must have government to maintain and regulate society, in order to prevent citizens from trumping others rights. Ideologies is a “prescription for society based on personal values.” A truly objective political ideology is almost impossible, but if it can be sensitive to the individual and best promotes their cooperation towards mutual ends. Ronald Reagan was a modern conservative who proposed many changes to how he thought…

    • 1738 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Jefferson’s Rule is that you do not have to agree with governmental ideas. It is perfectly acceptable to have conflicting viewpoints and you should have the freedom to voice your opinion and fight for what you believe. Thomas Jefferson was the voice for conflict in the United States. Jefferson desired federal state power, to keep the Articles of Confederation with a few amendments so that way, the government was not completely weakened and the citizens still had a few laws to live by. He believed in the people’s rights to voice one’s opinion, or rights to Liberty.…

    • 1018 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The importance of having citizens participate in the government is so that there is a fair share of views on what should be happening in our Government. When the Founding Fathers created the constitution, one of their motives was to promote general welfare. Before the government could make a decision of what the people wanted they needed to be able to see what they cared about. Mr. Mason argues, “ It ought to know & sympathise with every part of the community; and ought therefore to be taken not only from different parts of the whole republic, but also from different districts of the larger member of it.” (Chp. 5 Pg 102).…

    • 760 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Decent Essays

    Madison begins the essay with end goals to show how the government would help, and to try to convince the people that this is the way it should be. Madison claims that the ultimate goal of the government is to protect the diversity and help prevent tyranny. Madison ties to neutralize fear of strong federal authority by explain the idea of State Governments,…

    • 167 Words
    • 1 Pages
    Decent Essays
  • Superior Essays

    New Yorkers we would like your attention to what we believe could change the course of this country and our very own freedom. The Articles of Confederation contain great strengths yet it has many weakness, however we believe that we have the solutions to address the flaws. We have noticed that one of the biggest concerns of the people is safety from those who are foreign to us. There are six separate treaties with six separate countries that we have signed, all of them oppose a threat to us and we must be aware of them. If we continue to join and create treaties with other governments, we must be united rather than having individual states create the treaties.…

    • 1172 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    It will cause conflict, Hobbes states, “some form of “mixed” government with different branch of government holding different components of political authority, or government…and the people.” This is a valid statement because we have seen throughout history why mixed form of government cannot with stand together. Example is our own nation, Democratic and Republic so much conflict has risen due to the different ideology of running the government. Centuries ago we had a political party called Whig, which had disappeared due to other parties coming and take over them. Our nation has been facing such issues which creates conflict among individuals became one may believe one way and another may believe the opposite way. This creates conflict in governemt and in society.…

    • 748 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    The Founding Fathers

    • 1215 Words
    • 5 Pages

    “We the people of the United States… do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America” reflected the principle of democracy and the power of the people to choose what they want for the government. “…Establish justice, insure domestic tranquility, provide for the common defense, promote general welfare…” defined the equality in which the republic is founded, where justice is the main control of power. “...And secure the blessings of liberty to ourselves and our prosperity…” which the main purpose is to establish liberty as a principal characteristic of national…

    • 1215 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    “… the power vested in congress of sending troops for suppressing insurrections will always enable them to stifle the first struggles of freedom (Federalist Paper #8)." The preservation of individual liberties are the keys to a healthy government, and today individual liberties are essential to our democracy, they are what makes the United States different from other nations. As citizens of the United States, we must receive equal treatment under the law (“civil liberties”). After the ratification of the constitution the Anti-federalist created the bill of rights, which ensures a government can’t oppress its citizens. We see the influence of their concerns in the structure of government today, civil liberties are the face of the United…

    • 889 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In John Locke’s Second Treatise on Civil Government, he argues for his vision of society that has a small and restrained consent-driven government that respects the rights of its inhabitants. Locke might be best known for his unbounding aspirations of productivity and theory of a government being based on the consent of the governed, yet one of his most intriguing theories revolve around when citizens can rise up and dissolve a government. This is an essential theme of the treatise, and Locke addresses it at the end with a strong defense. While Locke strives to find harmony in his consent driven society, he opens the door to many more revolutions and constant change that he would hope to avoid for the benefit of the society and of the people.…

    • 2225 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Superior Essays