Understanding Asperger's Syndrome

Improved Essays
When you hear the word “developmental disability” most people would automatically look for a physical disability, but that’s not always the case. There're disabilities that you can’t see with the naked eye and Asperger’s syndrome is one of them. Asperger’s syndrome as defined by Autism Speaks Canada is “an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) considered to be on the “high functioning” end of the spectrum” (Asperger’s Syndrome, n.d.). The book Look Me in the eyes by John Elder Robison details John’s life as he grows up with an undiagnosed disability until the age of forty when he learns he has Asperger’s syndrome. To fully understand Asperger’s syndrome, it is important to look at the signs and symptoms of Asperger’s, the problems that these symptoms …show more content…
Some symptoms associated with Aspergers include; depression and anxiety, issues with social interactions and lack of eye contact. They can also show signs of behavioural issues such as attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder and obsessive tendencies. Some people even show savant skills associated with numbers, mathematics, mechanical and spatial skills. Although those with Asperger’s syndrome do not face any language or cognitive delays they show profound deficiencies when it comes to social communication skills. Social interactions can seem difficult for people with Asperger’s syndrome as they don’t understand simple nonverbal communication cues or may not understand the difference between what’s appropriate in certain settings. They might also have awkward mannerisms or issues with motor skills, which may cause clumsiness. Another symptom is that they often have one sided conversations, forgetting to ask about the other person life. With this particular symptom the person might come off as self-centred or emotionless. For example, in the book, John had taught himself “…to remember what’s happening with people close to my …show more content…
Many people use cognitive behavioural therapy to learn social skills and control emotions. Speech and language therapy can help with conversation skills. For example, John developed facial expressions that were “socially acceptable” in different situations rather than his normal emotionless facial expressions. John “learned to pause before responding when people approach … and then begin speaking” (Robison, 2007, p. 239). These adaptive skills help individuals with Asperger’s so they can function in the real world without any problems. Early intervention is key and parents play a big role when it comes to providing these individuals with a more intensive level of care. This might include creating opportunities for them to socialize, creating daily routines and schedules along with providing them with constant companionship. Constant support opportunities like these can help children with Asperger’s syndrome learn how to cope with their symptoms. In the book Look me in the eye, John’s parents did not know how to deal with him or help him with his difficulties, they did take him to therapy but the therapists categorized John as a rude and self-centered young man. They did not believe John had any disability but instead was just a lazy kid. Early intervention and diagnosis can truly help someone with Asperger’s

Related Documents

  • Improved Essays

    These thoughts and behavior patterns tend to negatively affect individual 's lives. This disorder makes it very difficult to create close relationships. Their feelings of inadequacy and fear of embarrassment often prevent them from speaking up in meetings or class, which could hinder job promotions or advancement. Due to their withdrawn nature, others tend to view those with avoidant personality disorder as stiff and…

    • 2217 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    One of the ways communication is effected is by the inadvertent way ASD individuals may sound self-centered. As stated previous ASD individuals have a difficult time understanding all the words in a conversation and therefore react to only the ones they understand. When communicating with other people this causes ASD individuals to seem like they have no interest in whatever the topic of the conversation may be. This mixed with sometimes inability to maintain eye contact can lead to the miss-interpretation of self-centeredness. According to Susan stokes, Individuals with ASD have issues understanding the turn-taking aspect of communication and will frequently change topics in an unnatural way to something they want to talk about(1), further instilling the perceived ego-centric attitude.…

    • 1449 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    In this group, individuals have difficulties with social interaction, language and a restricted range of activities and interests. They may have problems both in using and understanding language. Their speech is often well developed and fluent, but language may be used in unusual ways. The following spectrum of features and functional limitations may be seen in adults with autism spectrum disorder. The severity of the disabling effects is linked to the degree of co-existing learning difficulties/disabilities: • No speech or very limited vocabulary, echo speech of others • Do not understand language, use of emphasis or tone variation to convey meaning • Great difficulty in using or understanding nonverbal means of communication e.g.…

    • 1236 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Social anxiety is the fear of social situations that involve interaction with other people. Although sometimes people mistake the two, Social Anxiety Disorder is not the same as shyness. Nervous individuals may be uneasy around others, they by and large don't encounter the same sorts of amazing nervousness somebody with a social fear does. Moreover, bashful individuals don't take part in the routine of social circumstances that someone with Social Anxiety does. Research has shown there are two kinds: Specific Social Anxiety, which is a serious matter mainly for people whose work requires them to perform in public, and Generalized Social Anxiety, which occurs in a wide variety of settings and has pervasive effects on a person's life (Beyond shyness, 2003).…

    • 381 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Things such as psychological problems, depression, and low self-esteem are all different types of emotional barriers. Now I will get into semantics barriers which are a whole other type of barrier. This is when two or more people cannot agree on the meaning of certain terms. However, if the receiver doesn’t offer any sort of feedback, the terms can be interpreted differently than the sender planned. One other barrier is when someone isn’t a productive listener.…

    • 1090 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Superior Essays

    Without a proper support system from either parents, teachers, or therapists, many of the medications and treatments may not be as beneficial as they could be for children diagnosed. For example, parents who are always fighting and not paying attention to their child could ultimately spoil any chance to have improvement with their troubles by providing a toxic environment. Additionally, teachers who do not say anything about their student’s unsatisfactory behavior and/or learning habits because they believe that these children will grow out it also contribute to the unsuccessful outcomes that may result later in life. Though, some of the symptoms of ADHD may subside over time, it is not something that is grown out of. In the same way, being placed in the wrong type of school that does not cater to the type of learning style an ADHD child may have can contribute to being unsuccessful.…

    • 2346 Words
    • 10 Pages
    Superior Essays
  • Great Essays

    They also have trouble understanding other people’s feelings or talking about their own feelings which is a big reason why they will get upset and have outbursts when someone isn’t doing what they want; they usually have trouble expressing their needs using typical words or motions in the first place. They appear to be unaware when people talk to them, but respond to other sounds. They are also very interested in other people, but not know how to talk, play, or relate to them. Individuals with the disorder also tend to repeat or echo words or phrases said to them, or repeat words or phrases in place of normal language; also repeating actions over and over again quite frequently. One of the key issues individuals with autism have is the trouble to adapt to a routine…

    • 1562 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Great Essays
  • Improved Essays

    The first one is parent education and training. This treatment deals with educating caregivers about the child 's strengths and deficits and incorporating treatments such as social skills and behavior training into their everyday life. Next is social & speech skill therapy. Even though children with either syndrome may have strong language skills, they may still need to learn how to properly express their emotions appropriately. This includes teaching them how to speak in a monotone voice, make eye contact and also use hand gestures.…

    • 1812 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Some symptoms are Clumsy and uncoordinated motor movements, Fear of changes; sameness in daily routines can be very important for people routine and can help manage the anxiety of people. Lack of empathy, Problems with nonverbal communication Repetitive behavior or rituals, Socially and emotionally inappropriate behavior, Limited interest or preoccupation with a subject or interest can be obsessive as well as intense. Asperger’s have a lack in social interaction, they have poor communication and lack of imagination. Have trouble understanding other people’s feelings or talking about their own feeling, avoid eye contact may find it difficult to make and hold eye contact with people they are speaking to, want to be alone or want to interact, but not know how, speak in unusual ways or with and odd tone of voice seem nervous in large social group, have a hard time understanding body…

    • 953 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Improved Essays
  • Improved Essays

    Many parents should try “…not to stigmatise teens as attention seekers, or melodramatic, in case there’s an underlying issue” (Parkinson). If parents talk to their children, their children will likely feel more comfortable confronting them with a mental health concern. Then they can assist their children like I mentioned earlier which can help build trust between the parent and the child. This trust allows for a healthier relationship that will assist in many other issues such as the child confiding in their parent for other emotional issues. When I think of parents who ignore and invalidate their child, I think of my friend Dana’s parents.…

    • 1102 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Improved Essays