Dealing With Asperger's Syndrome In Children

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Aspergers syndrome is a common type of autism that is characterized by delayed cognitive development, difficulty with social interaction, and repetitive behavior. Aspergers is not a severely inhibiting form of autism and is said to be on the "highly-functioning" side of the autism spectrum. However, people who suffer from this syndrome do experience similar developmental and social challenges that people with autism do. Some of these challenges include: limited/awkward social interaction, repetitive speech/actions, inappropriate nonverbal communication, inability to understand social/emotional cues and nonliteral phrases, lack of eye contact, one sided conversations, etc. Aside from these challenges, people with Aspergers usually have an extremely …show more content…
It is important for teachers to realize how to handle these children and know how to create an environment that is comfortable for them to learn in. I think that patience and understanding is key for teachers to have when dealing with a child with Asperger 's. Sometimes dealing with people with this syndrome is a difficult task, but these children need people to be patient with their needs. They want to learn it is just a little more difficult for them to do so. I also think that teachers should work to include children with this syndrome in regular classroom activities. The more comfortable they get around other children, the easier it will be for them to learn how to appropriately socialize with others. I think that teachers should also communicate with the families of these children. The parents or siblings might have insight on how to soothe the child, how the child best learns, what makes the child happy, etc. Plus, these families also want to be involved in the growth of their child and it might ease their worries if they are actively involved in the educational aspect of the child with Asperger 's. Another important thing for teachers to remember is to not limit the child. People with this syndrome really want to be able to do the same things that other children do, and with time and hard work, they can! Don 't make …show more content…
With the support of families, friends and teachers, people with this syndrome can lead normal, happy lives. The key to interacting with people with this disability is having patience and being accepting of the way that they are. Have a sense of humor and treat them like you would any other human being because that is exactly what they

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