How Did John Wycliffe's Actions Influence The Medieval Church

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Religious movements of the Lollards and Hussites greatly affected the medieval church. These two groups were supporters of leaders John Wycliffe and John Huss. Both criticized the Catholic church of its actions and words and questioned the papacy’s true role. The church retaliated to show power and keep control on their side. The church attempted numerous times to rid the teachings of the two men but even after their deaths they had influence over people.
John Wycliffe’s writings inspired the religious movements of the Lollards in England. They found justification with their demands because of his work. Wycliffe was an Oxford scholar and a philosopher who acted as a spokesman for the people and their religious beliefs. Wycliffe criticized
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The church accused him after his death, he was thought to be sharing a dangerous teaching with his supporters. The church acted with their charge after his death, possibly because they feared what supporters would do to help if he was still alive. Wycliffe was considered an early reformer who critiqued the papacy and the basis of the Catholic church. The church wanted to keep its power so when people like Wycliffe acted against them they had to fight back to regain the trust of their own supporters. John Huss’s actions brought about his excommunication, which aimed to keep him away from the church and stop him from spreading his faulty opinions more people. Huss was accused of heresy while he was still alive and was imprisoned for his actions and teachings that were against the church. Huss’s death at the stake benefited the church because it rid them of the man who opposed them and inspired others to oppose the papacy. Huss’s supporters started a revolt which was not expected by the church and eventually won religious reform and control but still the church remained as the power. From Huss’s death not many more supporters could have increased to damage the church compared to if Huss was kept alive and secretly sharing his work. Of Huss’s supporters that believe in him from before his death, they led a revolt and eventually won religious reform and control, but still the church remained as the power.
John Wycliffe and John Huss were two influential leaders who demonstrated their religious beliefs for both the church and everyday people to here. They acted as leaders to many who shared the same beliefs against the church and through their words were able to make a change in people's lives as many fought and struggled to find their true religious identity. They led and influenced powerful religious movements that had paved the way for later changes

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